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Why i’m bullish on Zilliqa (long read)

Edit: TL;DR added in the comments
 
Hey all, I've been researching coins since 2017 and have gone through 100s of them in the last 3 years. I got introduced to blockchain via Bitcoin of course, analyzed Ethereum thereafter and from that moment I have a keen interest in smart contact platforms. I’m passionate about Ethereum but I find Zilliqa to have a better risk-reward ratio. Especially because Zilliqa has found an elegant balance between being secure, decentralized and scalable in my opinion.
 
Below I post my analysis of why from all the coins I went through I’m most bullish on Zilliqa (yes I went through Tezos, EOS, NEO, VeChain, Harmony, Algorand, Cardano etc.). Note that this is not investment advice and although it's a thorough analysis there is obviously some bias involved. Looking forward to what you all think!
 
Fun fact: the name Zilliqa is a play on ‘silica’ silicon dioxide which means “Silicon for the high-throughput consensus computer.”
 
This post is divided into (i) Technology, (ii) Business & Partnerships, and (iii) Marketing & Community. I’ve tried to make the technology part readable for a broad audience. If you’ve ever tried understanding the inner workings of Bitcoin and Ethereum you should be able to grasp most parts. Otherwise, just skim through and once you are zoning out head to the next part.
 
Technology and some more:
 
Introduction
 
The technology is one of the main reasons why I’m so bullish on Zilliqa. First thing you see on their website is: “Zilliqa is a high-performance, high-security blockchain platform for enterprises and next-generation applications.” These are some bold statements.
 
Before we deep dive into the technology let’s take a step back in time first as they have quite the history. The initial research paper from which Zilliqa originated dates back to August 2016: Elastico: A Secure Sharding Protocol For Open Blockchains where Loi Luu (Kyber Network) is one of the co-authors. Other ideas that led to the development of what Zilliqa has become today are: Bitcoin-NG, collective signing CoSi, ByzCoin and Omniledger.
 
The technical white paper was made public in August 2017 and since then they have achieved everything stated in the white paper and also created their own open source intermediate level smart contract language called Scilla (functional programming language similar to OCaml) too.
 
Mainnet is live since the end of January 2019 with daily transaction rates growing continuously. About a week ago mainnet reached 5 million transactions, 500.000+ addresses in total along with 2400 nodes keeping the network decentralized and secure. Circulating supply is nearing 11 billion and currently only mining rewards are left. The maximum supply is 21 billion with annual inflation being 7.13% currently and will only decrease with time.
 
Zilliqa realized early on that the usage of public cryptocurrencies and smart contracts were increasing but decentralized, secure, and scalable alternatives were lacking in the crypto space. They proposed to apply sharding onto a public smart contract blockchain where the transaction rate increases almost linear with the increase in the amount of nodes. More nodes = higher transaction throughput and increased decentralization. Sharding comes in many forms and Zilliqa uses network-, transaction- and computational sharding. Network sharding opens up the possibility of using transaction- and computational sharding on top. Zilliqa does not use state sharding for now. We’ll come back to this later.
 
Before we continue dissecting how Zilliqa achieves such from a technological standpoint it’s good to keep in mind that a blockchain being decentralised and secure and scalable is still one of the main hurdles in allowing widespread usage of decentralised networks. In my opinion this needs to be solved first before blockchains can get to the point where they can create and add large scale value. So I invite you to read the next section to grasp the underlying fundamentals. Because after all these premises need to be true otherwise there isn’t a fundamental case to be bullish on Zilliqa, right?
 
Down the rabbit hole
 
How have they achieved this? Let’s define the basics first: key players on Zilliqa are the users and the miners. A user is anybody who uses the blockchain to transfer funds or run smart contracts. Miners are the (shard) nodes in the network who run the consensus protocol and get rewarded for their service in Zillings (ZIL). The mining network is divided into several smaller networks called shards, which is also referred to as ‘network sharding’. Miners subsequently are randomly assigned to a shard by another set of miners called DS (Directory Service) nodes. The regular shards process transactions and the outputs of these shards are eventually combined by the DS shard as they reach consensus on the final state. More on how these DS shards reach consensus (via pBFT) will be explained later on.
 
The Zilliqa network produces two types of blocks: DS blocks and Tx blocks. One DS Block consists of 100 Tx Blocks. And as previously mentioned there are two types of nodes concerned with reaching consensus: shard nodes and DS nodes. Becoming a shard node or DS node is being defined by the result of a PoW cycle (Ethash) at the beginning of the DS Block. All candidate mining nodes compete with each other and run the PoW (Proof-of-Work) cycle for 60 seconds and the submissions achieving the highest difficulty will be allowed on the network. And to put it in perspective: the average difficulty for one DS node is ~ 2 Th/s equaling 2.000.000 Mh/s or 55 thousand+ GeForce GTX 1070 / 8 GB GPUs at 35.4 Mh/s. Each DS Block 10 new DS nodes are allowed. And a shard node needs to provide around 8.53 GH/s currently (around 240 GTX 1070s). Dual mining ETH/ETC and ZIL is possible and can be done via mining software such as Phoenix and Claymore. There are pools and if you have large amounts of hashing power (Ethash) available you could mine solo.
 
The PoW cycle of 60 seconds is a peak performance and acts as an entry ticket to the network. The entry ticket is called a sybil resistance mechanism and makes it incredibly hard for adversaries to spawn lots of identities and manipulate the network with these identities. And after every 100 Tx Blocks which corresponds to roughly 1,5 hour this PoW process repeats. In between these 1,5 hour, no PoW needs to be done meaning Zilliqa’s energy consumption to keep the network secure is low. For more detailed information on how mining works click here.
Okay, hats off to you. You have made it this far. Before we go any deeper down the rabbit hole we first must understand why Zilliqa goes through all of the above technicalities and understand a bit more what a blockchain on a more fundamental level is. Because the core of Zilliqa’s consensus protocol relies on the usage of pBFT (practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance) we need to know more about state machines and their function. Navigate to Viewblock, a Zilliqa block explorer, and just come back to this article. We will use this site to navigate through a few concepts.
 
We have established that Zilliqa is a public and distributed blockchain. Meaning that everyone with an internet connection can send ZILs, trigger smart contracts, etc. and there is no central authority who fully controls the network. Zilliqa and other public and distributed blockchains (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) can also be defined as state machines.
 
Taking the liberty of paraphrasing examples and definitions given by Samuel Brooks’ medium article, he describes the definition of a blockchain (like Zilliqa) as: “A peer-to-peer, append-only datastore that uses consensus to synchronize cryptographically-secure data”.
 
Next, he states that: "blockchains are fundamentally systems for managing valid state transitions”. For some more context, I recommend reading the whole medium article to get a better grasp of the definitions and understanding of state machines. Nevertheless, let’s try to simplify and compile it into a single paragraph. Take traffic lights as an example: all its states (red, amber, and green) are predefined, all possible outcomes are known and it doesn’t matter if you encounter the traffic light today or tomorrow. It will still behave the same. Managing the states of a traffic light can be done by triggering a sensor on the road or pushing a button resulting in one traffic lights’ state going from green to red (via amber) and another light from red to green.
 
With public blockchains like Zilliqa, this isn’t so straightforward and simple. It started with block #1 almost 1,5 years ago and every 45 seconds or so a new block linked to the previous block is being added. Resulting in a chain of blocks with transactions in it that everyone can verify from block #1 to the current #647.000+ block. The state is ever changing and the states it can find itself in are infinite. And while the traffic light might work together in tandem with various other traffic lights, it’s rather insignificant comparing it to a public blockchain. Because Zilliqa consists of 2400 nodes who need to work together to achieve consensus on what the latest valid state is while some of these nodes may have latency or broadcast issues, drop offline or are deliberately trying to attack the network, etc.
 
Now go back to the Viewblock page take a look at the amount of transaction, addresses, block and DS height and then hit refresh. Obviously as expected you see new incremented values on one or all parameters. And how did the Zilliqa blockchain manage to transition from a previous valid state to the latest valid state? By using pBFT to reach consensus on the latest valid state.
 
After having obtained the entry ticket, miners execute pBFT to reach consensus on the ever-changing state of the blockchain. pBFT requires a series of network communication between nodes, and as such there is no GPU involved (but CPU). Resulting in the total energy consumed to keep the blockchain secure, decentralized and scalable being low.
 
pBFT stands for practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance and is an optimization on the Byzantine Fault Tolerant algorithm. To quote Blockonomi: “In the context of distributed systems, Byzantine Fault Tolerance is the ability of a distributed computer network to function as desired and correctly reach a sufficient consensus despite malicious components (nodes) of the system failing or propagating incorrect information to other peers.” Zilliqa is such a distributed computer network and depends on the honesty of the nodes (shard and DS) to reach consensus and to continuously update the state with the latest block. If pBFT is a new term for you I can highly recommend the Blockonomi article.
 
The idea of pBFT was introduced in 1999 - one of the authors even won a Turing award for it - and it is well researched and applied in various blockchains and distributed systems nowadays. If you want more advanced information than the Blockonomi link provides click here. And if you’re in between Blockonomi and the University of Singapore read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 2 dating from October 2017.
Quoting from the Zilliqa tech whitepaper: “pBFT relies upon a correct leader (which is randomly selected) to begin each phase and proceed when the sufficient majority exists. In case the leader is byzantine it can stall the entire consensus protocol. To address this challenge, pBFT offers a view change protocol to replace the byzantine leader with another one.”
 
pBFT can tolerate ⅓ of the nodes being dishonest (offline counts as Byzantine = dishonest) and the consensus protocol will function without stalling or hiccups. Once there are more than ⅓ of dishonest nodes but no more than ⅔ the network will be stalled and a view change will be triggered to elect a new DS leader. Only when more than ⅔ of the nodes are dishonest (66%) double-spend attacks become possible.
 
If the network stalls no transactions can be processed and one has to wait until a new honest leader has been elected. When the mainnet was just launched and in its early phases, view changes happened regularly. As of today the last stalling of the network - and view change being triggered - was at the end of October 2019.
 
Another benefit of using pBFT for consensus besides low energy is the immediate finality it provides. Once your transaction is included in a block and the block is added to the chain it’s done. Lastly, take a look at this article where three types of finality are being defined: probabilistic, absolute and economic finality. Zilliqa falls under the absolute finality (just like Tendermint for example). Although lengthy already we skipped through some of the inner workings from Zilliqa’s consensus: read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 3 and you will be close to having a complete picture on it. Enough about PoW, sybil resistance mechanism, pBFT, etc. Another thing we haven’t looked at yet is the amount of decentralization.
 
Decentralisation
 
Currently, there are four shards, each one of them consisting of 600 nodes. 1 shard with 600 so-called DS nodes (Directory Service - they need to achieve a higher difficulty than shard nodes) and 1800 shard nodes of which 250 are shard guards (centralized nodes controlled by the team). The amount of shard guards has been steadily declining from 1200 in January 2019 to 250 as of May 2020. On the Viewblock statistics, you can see that many of the nodes are being located in the US but those are only the (CPU parts of the) shard nodes who perform pBFT. There is no data from where the PoW sources are coming. And when the Zilliqa blockchain starts reaching its transaction capacity limit, a network upgrade needs to be executed to lift the current cap of maximum 2400 nodes to allow more nodes and formation of more shards which will allow to network to keep on scaling according to demand.
Besides shard nodes there are also seed nodes. The main role of seed nodes is to serve as direct access points (for end-users and clients) to the core Zilliqa network that validates transactions. Seed nodes consolidate transaction requests and forward these to the lookup nodes (another type of nodes) for distribution to the shards in the network. Seed nodes also maintain the entire transaction history and the global state of the blockchain which is needed to provide services such as block explorers. Seed nodes in the Zilliqa network are comparable to Infura on Ethereum.
 
The seed nodes were first only operated by Zilliqa themselves, exchanges and Viewblock. Operators of seed nodes like exchanges had no incentive to open them for the greater public. They were centralised at first. Decentralisation at the seed nodes level has been steadily rolled out since March 2020 ( Zilliqa Improvement Proposal 3 ). Currently the amount of seed nodes is being increased, they are public-facing and at the same time PoS is applied to incentivize seed node operators and make it possible for ZIL holders to stake and earn passive yields. Important distinction: seed nodes are not involved with consensus! That is still PoW as entry ticket and pBFT for the actual consensus.
 
5% of the block rewards are being assigned to seed nodes (from the beginning in 2019) and those are being used to pay out ZIL stakers. The 5% block rewards with an annual yield of 10.03% translate to roughly 610 MM ZILs in total that can be staked. Exchanges use the custodial variant of staking and wallets like Moonlet will use the non-custodial version (starting in Q3 2020). Staking is being done by sending ZILs to a smart contract created by Zilliqa and audited by Quantstamp.
 
With a high amount of DS; shard nodes and seed nodes becoming more decentralized too, Zilliqa qualifies for the label of decentralized in my opinion.
 
Smart contracts
 
Let me start by saying I’m not a developer and my programming skills are quite limited. So I‘m taking the ELI5 route (maybe 12) but if you are familiar with Javascript, Solidity or specifically OCaml please head straight to Scilla - read the docs to get a good initial grasp of how Zilliqa’s smart contract language Scilla works and if you ask yourself “why another programming language?” check this article. And if you want to play around with some sample contracts in an IDE click here. The faucet can be found here. And more information on architecture, dapp development and API can be found on the Developer Portal.
If you are more into listening and watching: check this recent webinar explaining Zilliqa and Scilla. Link is time-stamped so you’ll start right away with a platform introduction, roadmap 2020 and afterwards a proper Scilla introduction.
 
Generalized: programming languages can be divided into being ‘object-oriented’ or ‘functional’. Here is an ELI5 given by software development academy: * “all programs have two basic components, data – what the program knows – and behavior – what the program can do with that data. So object-oriented programming states that combining data and related behaviors in one place, is called “object”, which makes it easier to understand how a particular program works. On the other hand, functional programming argues that data and behavior are different things and should be separated to ensure their clarity.” *
 
Scilla is on the functional side and shares similarities with OCaml: OCaml is a general-purpose programming language with an emphasis on expressiveness and safety. It has an advanced type system that helps catch your mistakes without getting in your way. It's used in environments where a single mistake can cost millions and speed matters, is supported by an active community, and has a rich set of libraries and development tools. For all its power, OCaml is also pretty simple, which is one reason it's often used as a teaching language.
 
Scilla is blockchain agnostic, can be implemented onto other blockchains as well, is recognized by academics and won a so-called Distinguished Artifact Award award at the end of last year.
 
One of the reasons why the Zilliqa team decided to create their own programming language focused on preventing smart contract vulnerabilities is that adding logic on a blockchain, programming, means that you cannot afford to make mistakes. Otherwise, it could cost you. It’s all great and fun blockchains being immutable but updating your code because you found a bug isn’t the same as with a regular web application for example. And with smart contracts, it inherently involves cryptocurrencies in some form thus value.
 
Another difference with programming languages on a blockchain is gas. Every transaction you do on a smart contract platform like Zilliqa or Ethereum costs gas. With gas you basically pay for computational costs. Sending a ZIL from address A to address B costs 0.001 ZIL currently. Smart contracts are more complex, often involve various functions and require more gas (if gas is a new concept click here ).
 
So with Scilla, similar to Solidity, you need to make sure that “every function in your smart contract will run as expected without hitting gas limits. An improper resource analysis may lead to situations where funds may get stuck simply because a part of the smart contract code cannot be executed due to gas limits. Such constraints are not present in traditional software systems”. Scilla design story part 1
 
Some examples of smart contract issues you’d want to avoid are: leaking funds, ‘unexpected changes to critical state variables’ (example: someone other than you setting his or her address as the owner of the smart contract after creation) or simply killing a contract.
 
Scilla also allows for formal verification. Wikipedia to the rescue: In the context of hardware and software systems, formal verification is the act of proving or disproving the correctness of intended algorithms underlying a system with respect to a certain formal specification or property, using formal methods of mathematics.
 
Formal verification can be helpful in proving the correctness of systems such as: cryptographic protocols, combinational circuits, digital circuits with internal memory, and software expressed as source code.
 
Scilla is being developed hand-in-hand with formalization of its semantics and its embedding into the Coq proof assistant — a state-of-the art tool for mechanized proofs about properties of programs.”
 
Simply put, with Scilla and accompanying tooling developers can be mathematically sure and proof that the smart contract they’ve written does what he or she intends it to do.
 
Smart contract on a sharded environment and state sharding
 
There is one more topic I’d like to touch on: smart contract execution in a sharded environment (and what is the effect of state sharding). This is a complex topic. I’m not able to explain it any easier than what is posted here. But I will try to compress the post into something easy to digest.
 
Earlier on we have established that Zilliqa can process transactions in parallel due to network sharding. This is where the linear scalability comes from. We can define simple transactions: a transaction from address A to B (Category 1), a transaction where a user interacts with one smart contract (Category 2) and the most complex ones where triggering a transaction results in multiple smart contracts being involved (Category 3). The shards are able to process transactions on their own without interference of the other shards. With Category 1 transactions that is doable, with Category 2 transactions sometimes if that address is in the same shard as the smart contract but with Category 3 you definitely need communication between the shards. Solving that requires to make a set of communication rules the protocol needs to follow in order to process all transactions in a generalised fashion.
 
And this is where the downsides of state sharding comes in currently. All shards in Zilliqa have access to the complete state. Yes the state size (0.1 GB at the moment) grows and all of the nodes need to store it but it also means that they don’t need to shop around for information available on other shards. Requiring more communication and adding more complexity. Computer science knowledge and/or developer knowledge required links if you want to dig further: Scilla - language grammar Scilla - Foundations for Verifiable Decentralised Computations on a Blockchain Gas Accounting NUS x Zilliqa: Smart contract language workshop
 
Easier to follow links on programming Scilla https://learnscilla.com/home Ivan on Tech
 
Roadmap / Zilliqa 2.0
 
There is no strict defined roadmap but here are topics being worked on. And via the Zilliqa website there is also more information on the projects they are working on.
 
Business & Partnerships
 
It’s not only technology in which Zilliqa seems to be excelling as their ecosystem has been expanding and starting to grow rapidly. The project is on a mission to provide OpenFinance (OpFi) to the world and Singapore is the right place to be due to its progressive regulations and futuristic thinking. Singapore has taken a proactive approach towards cryptocurrencies by introducing the Payment Services Act 2019 (PS Act). Among other things, the PS Act will regulate intermediaries dealing with certain cryptocurrencies, with a particular focus on consumer protection and anti-money laundering. It will also provide a stable regulatory licensing and operating framework for cryptocurrency entities, effectively covering all crypto businesses and exchanges based in Singapore. According to PWC 82% of the surveyed executives in Singapore reported blockchain initiatives underway and 13% of them have already brought the initiatives live to the market. There is also an increasing list of organizations that are starting to provide digital payment services. Moreover, Singaporean blockchain developers Building Cities Beyond has recently created an innovation $15 million grant to encourage development on its ecosystem. This all suggests that Singapore tries to position itself as (one of) the leading blockchain hubs in the world.
 
Zilliqa seems to already take advantage of this and recently helped launch Hg Exchange on their platform, together with financial institutions PhillipCapital, PrimePartners and Fundnel. Hg Exchange, which is now approved by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), uses smart contracts to represent digital assets. Through Hg Exchange financial institutions worldwide can use Zilliqa's safe-by-design smart contracts to enable the trading of private equities. For example, think of companies such as Grab, Airbnb, SpaceX that are not available for public trading right now. Hg Exchange will allow investors to buy shares of private companies & unicorns and capture their value before an IPO. Anquan, the main company behind Zilliqa, has also recently announced that they became a partner and shareholder in TEN31 Bank, which is a fully regulated bank allowing for tokenization of assets and is aiming to bridge the gap between conventional banking and the blockchain world. If STOs, the tokenization of assets, and equity trading will continue to increase, then Zilliqa’s public blockchain would be the ideal candidate due to its strategic positioning, partnerships, regulatory compliance and the technology that is being built on top of it.
 
What is also very encouraging is their focus on banking the un(der)banked. They are launching a stablecoin basket starting with XSGD. As many of you know, stablecoins are currently mostly used for trading. However, Zilliqa is actively trying to broaden the use case of stablecoins. I recommend everybody to read this text that Amrit Kumar wrote (one of the co-founders). These stablecoins will be integrated in the traditional markets and bridge the gap between the crypto world and the traditional world. This could potentially revolutionize and legitimise the crypto space if retailers and companies will for example start to use stablecoins for payments or remittances, instead of it solely being used for trading.
 
Zilliqa also released their DeFi strategic roadmap (dating November 2019) which seems to be aligning well with their OpFi strategy. A non-custodial DEX is coming to Zilliqa made by Switcheo which allows cross-chain trading (atomic swaps) between ETH, EOS and ZIL based tokens. They also signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a (soon to be announced) USD stablecoin. And as Zilliqa is all about regulations and being compliant, I’m speculating on it to be a regulated USD stablecoin. Furthermore, XSGD is already created and visible on block explorer and XIDR (Indonesian Stablecoin) is also coming soon via StraitsX. Here also an overview of the Tech Stack for Financial Applications from September 2019. Further quoting Amrit Kumar on this:
 
There are two basic building blocks in DeFi/OpFi though: 1) stablecoins as you need a non-volatile currency to get access to this market and 2) a dex to be able to trade all these financial assets. The rest are built on top of these blocks.
 
So far, together with our partners and community, we have worked on developing these building blocks with XSGD as a stablecoin. We are working on bringing a USD-backed stablecoin as well. We will soon have a decentralised exchange developed by Switcheo. And with HGX going live, we are also venturing into the tokenization space. More to come in the future.”
 
Additionally, they also have this ZILHive initiative that injects capital into projects. There have been already 6 waves of various teams working on infrastructure, innovation and research, and they are not from ASEAN or Singapore only but global: see Grantees breakdown by country. Over 60 project teams from over 20 countries have contributed to Zilliqa's ecosystem. This includes individuals and teams developing wallets, explorers, developer toolkits, smart contract testing frameworks, dapps, etc. As some of you may know, Unstoppable Domains (UD) blew up when they launched on Zilliqa. UD aims to replace cryptocurrency addresses with a human-readable name and allows for uncensorable websites. Zilliqa will probably be the only one able to handle all these transactions onchain due to ability to scale and its resulting low fees which is why the UD team launched this on Zilliqa in the first place. Furthermore, Zilliqa also has a strong emphasis on security, compliance, and privacy, which is why they partnered with companies like Elliptic, ChainSecurity (part of PwC Switzerland), and Incognito. Their sister company Aqilliz (Zilliqa spelled backwards) focuses on revolutionizing the digital advertising space and is doing interesting things like using Zilliqa to track outdoor digital ads with companies like Foodpanda.
 
Zilliqa is listed on nearly all major exchanges, having several different fiat-gateways and recently have been added to Binance’s margin trading and futures trading with really good volume. They also have a very impressive team with good credentials and experience. They don't just have “tech people”. They have a mix of tech people, business people, marketeers, scientists, and more. Naturally, it's good to have a mix of people with different skill sets if you work in the crypto space.
 
Marketing & Community
 
Zilliqa has a very strong community. If you just follow their Twitter their engagement is much higher for a coin that has approximately 80k followers. They also have been ‘coin of the day’ by LunarCrush many times. LunarCrush tracks real-time cryptocurrency value and social data. According to their data, it seems Zilliqa has a more fundamental and deeper understanding of marketing and community engagement than almost all other coins. While almost all coins have been a bit frozen in the last months, Zilliqa seems to be on its own bull run. It was somewhere in the 100s a few months ago and is currently ranked #46 on CoinGecko. Their official Telegram also has over 20k people and is very active, and their community channel which is over 7k now is more active and larger than many other official channels. Their local communities also seem to be growing.
 
Moreover, their community started ‘Zillacracy’ together with the Zilliqa core team ( see www.zillacracy.com ). It’s a community-run initiative where people from all over the world are now helping with marketing and development on Zilliqa. Since its launch in February 2020 they have been doing a lot and will also run their own non-custodial seed node for staking. This seed node will also allow them to start generating revenue for them to become a self sustaining entity that could potentially scale up to become a decentralized company working in parallel with the Zilliqa core team. Comparing it to all the other smart contract platforms (e.g. Cardano, EOS, Tezos etc.) they don't seem to have started a similar initiative (correct me if I’m wrong though). This suggests in my opinion that these other smart contract platforms do not fully understand how to utilize the ‘power of the community’. This is something you cannot ‘buy with money’ and gives many projects in the space a disadvantage.
 
Zilliqa also released two social products called SocialPay and Zeeves. SocialPay allows users to earn ZILs while tweeting with a specific hashtag. They have recently used it in partnership with the Singapore Red Cross for a marketing campaign after their initial pilot program. It seems like a very valuable social product with a good use case. I can see a lot of traditional companies entering the space through this product, which they seem to suggest will happen. Tokenizing hashtags with smart contracts to get network effect is a very smart and innovative idea.
 
Regarding Zeeves, this is a tipping bot for Telegram. They already have 1000s of signups and they plan to keep upgrading it for more and more people to use it (e.g. they recently have added a quiz features). They also use it during AMAs to reward people in real-time. It’s a very smart approach to grow their communities and get familiar with ZIL. I can see this becoming very big on Telegram. This tool suggests, again, that the Zilliqa team has a deeper understanding of what the crypto space and community needs and is good at finding the right innovative tools to grow and scale.
 
To be honest, I haven’t covered everything (i’m also reaching the character limited haha). So many updates happening lately that it's hard to keep up, such as the International Monetary Fund mentioning Zilliqa in their report, custodial and non-custodial Staking, Binance Margin, Futures, Widget, entering the Indian market, and more. The Head of Marketing Colin Miles has also released this as an overview of what is coming next. And last but not least, Vitalik Buterin has been mentioning Zilliqa lately acknowledging Zilliqa and mentioning that both projects have a lot of room to grow. There is much more info of course and a good part of it has been served to you on a silver platter. I invite you to continue researching by yourself :-) And if you have any comments or questions please post here!
submitted by haveyouheardaboutit to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

A trading system based on indicator CCI

A trading system based on indicator CCI
Wikipedia Commodity channel index
Commodity Index indicator is very simple in fact, though it has such a fancy name. Indicators in TSLab are based on C#. For those who have programming skills we provide API and indicator code samples at our Forum. CCI is available in TSLab as other indicators as well, but I would like to demonstrate a self-made one built according to wiki formulas. It is very easy to build new indicators by means of TSLab. CCI consists of Typical Price and Simple Moving Average. TSLab already has all to create CCI, but I showed in the indicator how to create Typical Price and Simple Moving Average. I urge you to study indicators. Making changes to indicators you get a chance to create a better one. Here is a customized CCI indicator. I applied adaptive moving average instead of simple moving average. And I applied exponential average instead of typical price. The chart in the middle shows the original CCI and the self-made one. As you may see their values are identical, as CCI in TSLab is done as it is described in wiki.

https://preview.redd.it/qyo63qnda5q51.png?width=1128&format=png&auto=webp&s=01c60fb93ad72dc72d024fb83aec4ec0d99b40ab
The lowest chart shows the customized indicator. It has clearly seen divergences.

https://preview.redd.it/f3c8vruha5q51.png?width=1913&format=png&auto=webp&s=e8a7aac86d88575907d8792e45e108e1bacb0cfb
Though it is not so unstable as the original one, it seems to be more flat. Wiki offers 2 types of strategies, saying that there are different points of view on this indicator. To build these strategies I am going to use my customized indicator instead of the original one. Some people think that in case with long positions we should buy, when CCI is higher than 100 and sell, when it is lower than 100. And for short positions – Sell when CCI is lower than -100 and close a short position, when CCI is higher than -100. For example this strategy doesn’t seem to be profitable with bitcoin at all.

https://preview.redd.it/xpgqp5xla5q51.png?width=1919&format=png&auto=webp&s=49fa5366938ef780d95c227ec1d549f6a8047077
Other people recommend using zero value as a signal calling this strategy Zero CCI. It means - buy (open a long position or close a short position), when Commodity Index is higher than zero or sell (close a long position, open a short position), when CCI is below zero.

https://preview.redd.it/gyisxbiqa5q51.png?width=1917&format=png&auto=webp&s=1885c903401b9eae93e58772ea46145a2605e47f
Let’s build a script which comprises both variants and resolve the dispute by means of optimization. If we think a bit we can see that there is one more strategy besides these two, this is to use average of CCI instead of signal lines. And we can at least combine all three strategies together. For example, we can enter a position at about zero point. And close long positions when CCI crosses its average, when the indicator is higher than 100 and lower than -100 for short positions. My customized indicator won’t do for this strategy because of divergences. The original one won’t do either as it is not stable and there can be many false signals. Try to create an indicator as flat as mine or even better but with fewer divergences.
Good luck to everyone!
submitted by AlGo- to TSLab [link] [comments]

Beermoney for Busy People 2020 (No DQ's!)

Beermoney for Busy People! (2020)

Hi! Last year I made a couple posts about sites that don't have DQs and are worth your time to use even if you have a busy life! I am a full-time student and work while in school so I don't always have time to grind out surveys for hours at a time. To qualify for this list, the sites can't DQ and have to be worth your time to use! Hope these help! Let's get into it.
 

Zogo iOS | Android | Invite Code: 88W6A

Zogo is an iOS and Android app that pays you to learn about personal finance. It is backed by a variety of established banks and is actually quite interesting to learn through. The app is designed to take you in a linear path through a variety of different financial topics. These topics range from budgeting and credit, to investing and insurance. The topics start off relatively simple, and get more complex as you move through the modules. Each topic has a set of flashcards for you to read and study. After reading these flashcards, you take a short quiz with about 5 multiple choice questions about the topic. Most of these questions seemed fairly easy to me and I didn't really need to spend time reading the flash cards to get the questions correct. You have a set of 5 hearts, and for every question you get wrong you lose one. Once you lose all 5 hearts you have to wait until they regenerate to continue answering questions. You can cash out for a wide variety of gift cards such as Amazon and Target at $5. I believe you need an invite code to register so I have provided mine above.
 

CrowdTap

CrowdTap is a great site for short polls and surveys that is available online and in a new mobile app on iOS and Android! The questions are about things such as consumer goods, food products, and services. The polls pay 1.5 cents each and the short answer questions pay 10 cents each (converted from their points system). Some of these polls are combined into longer surveys, and some are single one question polls. All of them are well worth it for the time that they take and there are no DQ’s of any sort. Reward options include Amazon, Target, Walmart, Steam, Xbox, and more. You can cash out starting at $5 and I am able to cash out about once a week. Make sure to give quality answers and look out for attention checks because people have been banned for not giving quality answers. Definitely add this one to your routine if you have not yet.
 

PaidViewpoint (Non-Ref) (Referral)

This is a site with short surveys and no DQ’s. There are short surveys (10ish questions) to collect demographic data that pay $0.10. As you do these, your trait score increases. Having a high trait score makes it more likely to get high paying surveys. You have to be patient, and you might go weeks without a survey, but once you get to max trait score it is definitely worth it. I have a max trait score and I get at least one survey (if not more) per day. The real surveys that aren’t just for demographics can pay upwards of $2. You can cash out at $15 via PayPal, Amazon, or Walmart. Just as some inspiration to stick with it, after hitting max traitscore I am on track to make $150 on here this year!
 

PartTimeClicks

This site pays you to complete short tasks. These tasks mostly involve searching a certain phrase in Google and copy and pasting the results. These tasks pay $0.25-$0.30 and take about a minute. You can also go into the settings and opt into receiving review tasks. These require you leaving a review on a site that it tells you to. I haven’t gotten one of these yet but they pay much better than the normal tasks. I make about $2 a week here in 1-2 minutes a day. You can turn on text alerts for new tasks in the settings which would help increase your earnings.
 

Pinecone Research

Pinecone is a great survey site with surveys about consumer products and food that don’t DQ and pay $3 per 10ish minute survey. I get an average of one a week. They also sometimes send you samples of the products to review and I have gotten several of these this year! The catch is that you have to find an invite to join the panel. These can be found on offers or banner ads on GPT sites so keep an eye out for one! It is well worth your time to sign up. You can cash out for PayPal and many gift cards at a $5 minimum.
 

PollPass

PollPass kinda reminds me of CrowdTap. You answer short polls to earn points. They aren’t always available, but seem to pop up almost once a day in batches of 10-20 questions. I seem to get 1 cent per question but that’s not too bad because it’s basically one click per question. They recently reduced the cash out minimum and you can now cash out at $3.00 (3000 points) for Amazon and PayPal!
 

Prolific

This one is great. You take academic surveys for universities and researchers and get paid in cash. I have been getting tons of surveys on here right now about Covid-19. As long as you don’t miss attention checks you won’t ever get disqualified. Some people get multiple surveys a day and others get only a few a week based on demographics. Usually it slows down in the summer because school isn’t in session, but they’ve had a lot of surveys available this summer. Many surveys pay at least minimum wage. Pro tip, if you every have a problem with a survey or miss an attention check that you noticed, try contacting the researcher and often they can fix the problem for you. You can cash out with PayPal with no fees (for U.S. users).
 

YouGov

YouGov is a survey site/app that pays anywhere from $0.50 to $2 per survey. You never disqualify. I get a couple surveys a week. Most of the surveys are about public policy, politics, or general opinions of companies. You get the best value for your points if you save up for the $100 cash out. They offer the $100 cash out in bank transfer and Amazon. The Amazon gift card option used to be a physical mailed card but now its an e-gift card so that makes it even better! They offer other gift cards but they are for smaller values at worse rates so I would avoid them. Available online, on android, and on iOS.
 

E-Poll Surveys (Non-Ref) (Referral)

E-poll is a survey site with surveys that don’t DQ. They send you surveys via email when they are available. The surveys are often about pop culture, TV shows, and celebrities. Some of them pay better than others for the time it takes to complete them, but most are well worth your time. Make sure to complete the surveys soon after you get the email, because some fill up within a day or so. You can cash out for several gift card options including Amazon and Starbucks. You get better rates with the higher valued gift cards so I always save up for the highest ones.
 

Be Forthright

Forthright is a survey site with a nice twist. You sign up and receive invitations to surveys via email. I don’t usually do their “partner surveys” because they often DQ and you can get stuck in an endless loop, which doesn’t really fit with the point of this post.. Their non-partner surveys are awesome. They pay well for the time spent but they also have one of the best disqualification bonuses I have ever seen. Every three surveys you take, regardless of whether you disqualify or not, you get a $2 bonus. That is $0.66 per survey on top of its base pay regardless of whether you qualify or not. The base pay for the surveys ranges from $1-3 depending on length, which varies from 10-30 mins. They usually take much less time than the estimated length. I get a non-partner survey about once every 1-2 weeks and made around $50 here last year with minimum time spent. They pay instantly with PayPal, Amazon, or Bitcoin with no minimum.
 

Perksy

Perksy is an app that sends you short surveys that they call “stacks”. These surveys generally pay anywhere from $0.30 to $1.00 and I get about one a week. You can’t DQ from these and they only take a minute or two. The minimum cashout is pretty high at $25 but when you sign up you get a signup bonus that gets you pretty close to your first cashout. I am able to cash out about once a year. They offer a lot of different gift cards but the most notable ones are Amazon and Target.
 

Google Opinion Rewards (Android) (iOS)

This one is quite popular and most of you have probably heard of it. This app is run by Google that will send you short surveys. If you have the app on iOS you can cash out to PayPal at $2, but on Android you can only cash out to Google Play balance. People who travel a lot or use a lot of Google services may get more surveys than others. I make $10ish dollars a year on here but I’ve seen others make more.
 

OnePulse (Android) (iOS)

This is one of my favorites. The app will send you “Pulses” that you can answer for cash. The surveys start out paying around $0.25 each but as you level up your account they pay more. Mine currently pay $0.34. They have non-paid pulses that can level up your account but those aren’t really worth doing. The minimum cash out is $5 via PayPal. I have made about $10 here just in the last week due to pulses about Covid-19.
 

SurveyMonkeyRewards (Android) (iOS)

This is an app that is owned by SurveyMonkey, the popular survey development company. It offers short surveys that pay anywhere from $0.25 to $0.50 depending on length. The surveys take no longer than 3-5 minutes. They technically can DQ, but this happens very rarely and only at the very beginning of a survey. The nice thing about the surveys is that they use SurveyMonkey's survey software so they are consistent and easy to complete. While they do send notifications, earnings on here depend on how often you check the app because they don't always notify you. I try to check the app at least once or twice a day. You can cash out at $5 for Amazon with instant payments.
 

SurveyMini (Android) (iOS)

SurveyMini is a little different. The app sends you surveys when you visit different stores to review your experience there. They ask you about your satisfaction with the store, what areas you bought from, etc. The surveys usually pay $0.10 and take about a minute, but some can randomly pay up to $0.75. The more you visit stores, the more surveys you will get. You can cash out at $10 but you get slightly better rates the more you save up. They offer e-gift cards such as iTunes, Xbox, and Visa, but sadly no Amazon. I am on pace to cash out for $25 twice this year.
 

Eureka

Eureka is an app that is similar to Perksy and OnePulse. The app sends you notifications when a new survey is available. The surveys are short and usually only 2-3 questions, and pay $0.15. The cool thing about Eureka is that they reward thoughtful answers. The person who submits the best answer gets a bonus that varies anywhere from $5-$45! Once you hit $10, you can cash out for Amazon or Paypal. They also have survey router surveys but I don't really do those. Unfortunately it appears to be iOS only at the moment.
 
Thanks for reading! Hope these beermoney sites/apps help you make better use of your beermoney earning time! Let me know if there are any sites that I didn't include that would fall into those category. Give my profile a follow for more beermoney related posts in the future! If you want to read more of my posts, here's one of my favorites to get you started!
Have a great rest of your week :)
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A Software Engineer's Explanation of Server Ticks/FPS, the Message Pump, and Server Meshing

Since people liked my last post about the SQ42 report, I thought I would do another about the recent comment about server ticks https://robertsspaceindustries.com/spectrum/community/SC/forum/50259/thread/end-goal-server-tick-rate/2872293
To understand how this works, you must first understand the Message Pump. This is basically the heart beat of an application. It is a loop from which there is no escape, so long as the application runs. All applications have an "entry point" that initially gets called. If you've ever taken Computer Science 101, it would be your "main" function. For a console application, you enter main, it does some things, and then when it leaves main, the application closes. In an application with a graphical user interface, that loop has to regularly call a Render or Draw function that draws the UI. This happens on the Render Thread. In a regular client application your Message Pump will look something like this:
while(IsApplicationRunning) { //loop while application is meant to run HandleKeyboardInputs(); //check to see if any keyboard events have occured HandleMouseInputs(); //check to see if any mouse events have occurred, hittest children HandleSizeChanges(); //check if the window has resized, resize children to fit Render(); //recursively render all child controls } 
Each function call within the loop will call entire hierarchies of functionality. This same basic principal applies to a server as well. I am using my imagination, as I have never audited the Star Citizen codebase, but its message pump would look something like
while(IsServerOnline) { //loop while server is meant to run HandleOrbitalRotation(); //update position of all planets around the sun HandleNPCRoutines(); //update position/animations of all NPCs SynchronizePlayerLocations(); //receive player location packets and update //internal locations CheckForIssues(); //check all object positions and ensure no conflicts UpdatePlayerLocations(); //send new location data of all objects to connected //players } 
This is only the most basic sort of functionality, that doesn't factor in things like Server Object Container Streaming or Meshing or object persistence.
Each iteration of the Message Pump is a frame. These frames are calculated by having a Stopwatch and taking averages of how long it takes each frame to complete across a defined sample size. If you have a target frame rate, like 30fps for instance, subroutines can be prioritized to try to either run on the current frame, or be skipped, based on how much load is put on the servers.
My current understanding, based on Star Citizen's published material, is that there is presently one server for every 50 players, and that server handles an entire star system. Having one server for every 50 players right now is fine, and that number can hopefully be increased as optimizations happen within the code.
The important part is modifying the server code so that they can separate different Object Containers to separate physical server hardware. This would allow them to, for instance, have one server, with its own message pump, handle Port Olisar, for up to 50 players. For v0 of server meshing, I would imagine that, when the 51st player comes to PO, they would have to spin up a new server for that person of PO, and they would be on their own. When the player count goes back below 50, that server can go back to sleep and is available to be repurposed for whatever other area needs it, dynamically. As players leave PO, and go into space, each part of space could have dedicated servers for that area. The same goes for planets, or cities. Each would be its own Object Container, each Object Container could contain smaller Object Containers, so that as players move around, servers would seamlessly spin up or down to host content for the players. Technically, one server could even host multiple separate Object Containers if they both have low player counts.
This would go a very long way towards making the universe feel full and connected. To start out with, you might still only find a maximum of 50 people on Daymar, but you might also find 50 people on Yela, or ArcCorp. Each place could be full, with the game client switching servers when going to different areas. Server Object Container Streaming is what enables this. It is just a matter of handling the trade off between servers, and keeping everything synchronized. I recognize that the posts that CIG makes on the subject are often hard to understand for laymen, but these posts make me feel confident that they are making progress and heading in a meaningful direction toward the end goal of having us seamlessly switch between servers on the fly.
One thing that I have no heard anything about is the transition towards specialized physical hardware for handling some of these large-scale server-side operations. If they are using regular CPU/GPU operations, performance could be *vastly* improved by creating FPGAs or ASICs that could perform calculations with greater alacrity than a GPU could ever hope to. This is the type of hardware used in medical devices, data centers, or bitcoin mining.
I wrote this up purely to help people understand some aspects of software engineer, and no part of it is meant to be so specific that you should interpret it to be exactly how something works. I am trying to provide a high level, easy to understand, idea of some very complex concepts.
If there is any other part of development that you would like me to comment on feel free to @ me with VerdantNonsense :) Stay safe out there.
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Why i’m bullish on Zilliqa (long read)

Hey all, I've been researching coins since 2017 and have gone through 100s of them in the last 3 years. I got introduced to blockchain via Bitcoin of course, analysed Ethereum thereafter and from that moment I have a keen interest in smart contact platforms. I’m passionate about Ethereum but I find Zilliqa to have a better risk reward ratio. Especially because Zilliqa has found an elegant balance between being secure, decentralised and scalable in my opinion.
 
Below I post my analysis why from all the coins I went through I’m most bullish on Zilliqa (yes I went through Tezos, EOS, NEO, VeChain, Harmony, Algorand, Cardano etc.). Note that this is not investment advice and although it's a thorough analysis there is obviously some bias involved. Looking forward to what you all think!
 
Fun fact: the name Zilliqa is a play on ‘silica’ silicon dioxide which means “Silicon for the high-throughput consensus computer.”
 
This post is divided into (i) Technology, (ii) Business & Partnerships, and (iii) Marketing & Community. I’ve tried to make the technology part readable for a broad audience. If you’ve ever tried understanding the inner workings of Bitcoin and Ethereum you should be able to grasp most parts. Otherwise just skim through and once you are zoning out head to the next part.
 
Technology and some more:
 
Introduction The technology is one of the main reasons why I’m so bullish on Zilliqa. First thing you see on their website is: “Zilliqa is a high-performance, high-security blockchain platform for enterprises and next-generation applications.” These are some bold statements.
 
Before we deep dive into the technology let’s take a step back in time first as they have quite the history. The initial research paper from which Zilliqa originated dates back to August 2016: Elastico: A Secure Sharding Protocol For Open Blockchains where Loi Luu (Kyber Network) is one of the co-authors. Other ideas that led to the development of what Zilliqa has become today are: Bitcoin-NG, collective signing CoSi, ByzCoin and Omniledger.
 
The technical white paper was made public in August 2017 and since then they have achieved everything stated in the white paper and also created their own open source intermediate level smart contract language called Scilla (functional programming language similar to OCaml) too.
 
Mainnet is live since end of January 2019 with daily transaction rate growing continuously. About a week ago mainnet reached 5 million transactions, 500.000+ addresses in total along with 2400 nodes keeping the network decentralised and secure. Circulating supply is nearing 11 billion and currently only mining rewards are left. Maximum supply is 21 billion with annual inflation being 7.13% currently and will only decrease with time.
 
Zilliqa realised early on that the usage of public cryptocurrencies and smart contracts were increasing but decentralised, secure and scalable alternatives were lacking in the crypto space. They proposed to apply sharding onto a public smart contract blockchain where the transaction rate increases almost linear with the increase in amount of nodes. More nodes = higher transaction throughput and increased decentralisation. Sharding comes in many forms and Zilliqa uses network-, transaction- and computational sharding. Network sharding opens up the possibility of using transaction- and computational sharding on top. Zilliqa does not use state sharding for now. We’ll come back to this later.
 
Before we continue disecting how Zilliqa achieves such from a technological standpoint it’s good to keep in mind that a blockchain being decentralised and secure and scalable is still one of the main hurdles in allowing widespread usage of decentralised networks. In my opinion this needs to be solved first before blockchains can get to the point where they can create and add large scale value. So I invite you to read the next section to grasp the underlying fundamentals. Because after all these premises need to be true otherwise there isn’t a fundamental case to be bullish on Zilliqa, right?
 
Down the rabbit hole
 
How have they achieved this? Let’s define the basics first: key players on Zilliqa are the users and the miners. A user is anybody who uses the blockchain to transfer funds or run smart contracts. Miners are the (shard) nodes in the network who run the consensus protocol and get rewarded for their service in Zillings (ZIL). The mining network is divided into several smaller networks called shards, which is also referred to as ‘network sharding’. Miners subsequently are randomly assigned to a shard by another set of miners called DS (Directory Service) nodes. The regular shards process transactions and the outputs of these shards are eventually combined by the DS shard as they reach consensus on the final state. More on how these DS shards reach consensus (via pBFT) will be explained later on.
 
The Zilliqa network produces two types of blocks: DS blocks and Tx blocks. One DS Block consists of 100 Tx Blocks. And as previously mentioned there are two types of nodes concerned with reaching consensus: shard nodes and DS nodes. Becoming a shard node or DS node is being defined by the result of a PoW cycle (Ethash) at the beginning of the DS Block. All candidate mining nodes compete with each other and run the PoW (Proof-of-Work) cycle for 60 seconds and the submissions achieving the highest difficulty will be allowed on the network. And to put it in perspective: the average difficulty for one DS node is ~ 2 Th/s equaling 2.000.000 Mh/s or 55 thousand+ GeForce GTX 1070 / 8 GB GPUs at 35.4 Mh/s. Each DS Block 10 new DS nodes are allowed. And a shard node needs to provide around 8.53 GH/s currently (around 240 GTX 1070s). Dual mining ETH/ETC and ZIL is possible and can be done via mining software such as Phoenix and Claymore. There are pools and if you have large amounts of hashing power (Ethash) available you could mine solo.
 
The PoW cycle of 60 seconds is a peak performance and acts as an entry ticket to the network. The entry ticket is called a sybil resistance mechanism and makes it incredibly hard for adversaries to spawn lots of identities and manipulate the network with these identities. And after every 100 Tx Blocks which corresponds to roughly 1,5 hour this PoW process repeats. In between these 1,5 hour no PoW needs to be done meaning Zilliqa’s energy consumption to keep the network secure is low. For more detailed information on how mining works click here.
Okay, hats off to you. You have made it this far. Before we go any deeper down the rabbit hole we first must understand why Zilliqa goes through all of the above technicalities and understand a bit more what a blockchain on a more fundamental level is. Because the core of Zilliqa’s consensus protocol relies on the usage of pBFT (practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance) we need to know more about state machines and their function. Navigate to Viewblock, a Zilliqa block explorer, and just come back to this article. We will use this site to navigate through a few concepts.
 
We have established that Zilliqa is a public and distributed blockchain. Meaning that everyone with an internet connection can send ZILs, trigger smart contracts etc. and there is no central authority who fully controls the network. Zilliqa and other public and distributed blockchains (like Bitcoin and Ethereum) can also be defined as state machines.
 
Taking the liberty of paraphrasing examples and definitions given by Samuel Brooks’ medium article, he describes the definition of a blockchain (like Zilliqa) as:
“A peer-to-peer, append-only datastore that uses consensus to synchronise cryptographically-secure data”.
 
Next he states that: >“blockchains are fundamentally systems for managing valid state transitions”.* For some more context, I recommend reading the whole medium article to get a better grasp of the definitions and understanding of state machines. Nevertheless, let’s try to simplify and compile it into a single paragraph. Take traffic lights as an example: all its states (red, amber and green) are predefined, all possible outcomes are known and it doesn’t matter if you encounter the traffic light today or tomorrow. It will still behave the same. Managing the states of a traffic light can be done by triggering a sensor on the road or pushing a button resulting in one traffic lights’ state going from green to red (via amber) and another light from red to green.
 
With public blockchains like Zilliqa this isn’t so straightforward and simple. It started with block #1 almost 1,5 years ago and every 45 seconds or so a new block linked to the previous block is being added. Resulting in a chain of blocks with transactions in it that everyone can verify from block #1 to the current #647.000+ block. The state is ever changing and the states it can find itself in are infinite. And while the traffic light might work together in tandem with various other traffic lights, it’s rather insignificant comparing it to a public blockchain. Because Zilliqa consists of 2400 nodes who need to work together to achieve consensus on what the latest valid state is while some of these nodes may have latency or broadcast issues, drop offline or are deliberately trying to attack the network etc.
 
Now go back to the Viewblock page take a look at the amount of transaction, addresses, block and DS height and then hit refresh. Obviously as expected you see new incremented values on one or all parameters. And how did the Zilliqa blockchain manage to transition from a previous valid state to the latest valid state? By using pBFT to reach consensus on the latest valid state.
 
After having obtained the entry ticket, miners execute pBFT to reach consensus on the ever changing state of the blockchain. pBFT requires a series of network communication between nodes, and as such there is no GPU involved (but CPU). Resulting in the total energy consumed to keep the blockchain secure, decentralised and scalable being low.
 
pBFT stands for practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance and is an optimisation on the Byzantine Fault Tolerant algorithm. To quote Blockonomi: “In the context of distributed systems, Byzantine Fault Tolerance is the ability of a distributed computer network to function as desired and correctly reach a sufficient consensus despite malicious components (nodes) of the system failing or propagating incorrect information to other peers.” Zilliqa is such a distributed computer network and depends on the honesty of the nodes (shard and DS) to reach consensus and to continuously update the state with the latest block. If pBFT is a new term for you I can highly recommend the Blockonomi article.
 
The idea of pBFT was introduced in 1999 - one of the authors even won a Turing award for it - and it is well researched and applied in various blockchains and distributed systems nowadays. If you want more advanced information than the Blockonomi link provides click here. And if you’re in between Blockonomi and University of Singapore read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 2 dating from October 2017.
Quoting from the Zilliqa tech whitepaper: “pBFT relies upon a correct leader (which is randomly selected) to begin each phase and proceed when the sufficient majority exists. In case the leader is byzantine it can stall the entire consensus protocol. To address this challenge, pBFT offers a view change protocol to replace the byzantine leader with another one.”
 
pBFT can tolerate ⅓ of the nodes being dishonest (offline counts as Byzantine = dishonest) and the consensus protocol will function without stalling or hiccups. Once there are more than ⅓ of dishonest nodes but no more than ⅔ the network will be stalled and a view change will be triggered to elect a new DS leader. Only when more than ⅔ of the nodes are dishonest (>66%) double spend attacks become possible.
 
If the network stalls no transactions can be processed and one has to wait until a new honest leader has been elected. When the mainnet was just launched and in its early phases, view changes happened regularly. As of today the last stalling of the network - and view change being triggered - was at the end of October 2019.
 
Another benefit of using pBFT for consensus besides low energy is the immediate finality it provides. Once your transaction is included in a block and the block is added to the chain it’s done. Lastly, take a look at this article where three types of finality are being defined: probabilistic, absolute and economic finality. Zilliqa falls under the absolute finality (just like Tendermint for example). Although lengthy already we skipped through some of the inner workings from Zilliqa’s consensus: read the Zilliqa Design Story Part 3 and you will be close to having a complete picture on it. Enough about PoW, sybil resistance mechanism, pBFT etc. Another thing we haven’t looked at yet is the amount of decentralisation.
 
Decentralisation
 
Currently there are four shards, each one of them consisting of 600 nodes. 1 shard with 600 so called DS nodes (Directory Service - they need to achieve a higher difficulty than shard nodes) and 1800 shard nodes of which 250 are shard guards (centralised nodes controlled by the team). The amount of shard guards has been steadily declining from 1200 in January 2019 to 250 as of May 2020. On the Viewblock statistics you can see that many of the nodes are being located in the US but those are only the (CPU parts of the) shard nodes who perform pBFT. There is no data from where the PoW sources are coming. And when the Zilliqa blockchain starts reaching their transaction capacity limit, a network upgrade needs to be executed to lift the current cap of maximum 2400 nodes to allow more nodes and formation of more shards which will allow to network to keep on scaling according to demand.
Besides shard nodes there are also seed nodes. The main role of seed nodes is to serve as direct access points (for end users and clients) to the core Zilliqa network that validates transactions. Seed nodes consolidate transaction requests and forward these to the lookup nodes (another type of nodes) for distribution to the shards in the network. Seed nodes also maintain the entire transaction history and the global state of the blockchain which is needed to provide services such as block explorers. Seed nodes in the Zilliqa network are comparable to Infura on Ethereum.
 
The seed nodes were first only operated by Zilliqa themselves, exchanges and Viewblock. Operators of seed nodes like exchanges had no incentive to open them for the greater public.They were centralised at first. Decentralisation at the seed nodes level has been steadily rolled out since March 2020 ( Zilliqa Improvement Proposal 3 ). Currently the amount of seed nodes is being increased, they are public facing and at the same time PoS is applied to incentivize seed node operators and make it possible for ZIL holders to stake and earn passive yields. Important distinction: seed nodes are not involved with consensus! That is still PoW as entry ticket and pBFT for the actual consensus.
 
5% of the block rewards are being assigned to seed nodes (from the beginning in 2019) and those are being used to pay out ZIL stakers.The 5% block rewards with an annual yield of 10.03% translates to roughly 610 MM ZILs in total that can be staked. Exchanges use the custodial variant of staking and wallets like Moonlet will use the non custodial version (starting in Q3 2020). Staking is being done by sending ZILs to a smart contract created by Zilliqa and audited by Quantstamp.
 
With a high amount of DS & shard nodes and seed nodes becoming more decentralised too, Zilliqa qualifies for the label of decentralised in my opinion.
 
Smart contracts
 
Let me start by saying I’m not a developer and my programming skills are quite limited. So I‘m taking the ELI5 route (maybe 12) but if you are familiar with Javascript, Solidity or specifically OCaml please head straight to Scilla - read the docs to get a good initial grasp of how Zilliqa’s smart contract language Scilla works and if you ask yourself “why another programming language?” check this article. And if you want to play around with some sample contracts in an IDE click here. Faucet can be found here. And more information on architecture, dapp development and API can be found on the Developer Portal.
If you are more into listening and watching: check this recent webinar explaining Zilliqa and Scilla. Link is time stamped so you’ll start right away with a platform introduction, R&D roadmap 2020 and afterwards a proper Scilla introduction.
 
Generalised: programming languages can be divided into being ‘object oriented’ or ‘functional’. Here is an ELI5 given by software development academy: > “all programmes have two basic components, data – what the programme knows – and behaviour – what the programme can do with that data. So object-oriented programming states that combining data and related behaviours in one place, is called “object”, which makes it easier to understand how a particular program works. On the other hand, functional programming argues that data and behaviour are different things and should be separated to ensure their clarity.”
 
Scilla is on the functional side and shares similarities with OCaml: > OCaml is a general purpose programming language with an emphasis on expressiveness and safety. It has an advanced type system that helps catch your mistakes without getting in your way. It's used in environments where a single mistake can cost millions and speed matters, is supported by an active community, and has a rich set of libraries and development tools. For all its power, OCaml is also pretty simple, which is one reason it's often used as a teaching language.
 
Scilla is blockchain agnostic, can be implemented onto other blockchains as well, is recognised by academics and won a so called Distinguished Artifact Award award at the end of last year.
 
One of the reasons why the Zilliqa team decided to create their own programming language focused on preventing smart contract vulnerabilities safety is that adding logic on a blockchain, programming, means that you cannot afford to make mistakes. Otherwise it could cost you. It’s all great and fun blockchains being immutable but updating your code because you found a bug isn’t the same as with a regular web application for example. And with smart contracts it inherently involves cryptocurrencies in some form thus value.
 
Another difference with programming languages on a blockchain is gas. Every transaction you do on a smart contract platform like Zilliqa for Ethereum costs gas. With gas you basically pay for computational costs. Sending a ZIL from address A to address B costs 0.001 ZIL currently. Smart contracts are more complex, often involve various functions and require more gas (if gas is a new concept click here ).
 
So with Scilla, similar to Solidity, you need to make sure that “every function in your smart contract will run as expected without hitting gas limits. An improper resource analysis may lead to situations where funds may get stuck simply because a part of the smart contract code cannot be executed due to gas limits. Such constraints are not present in traditional software systems”. Scilla design story part 1
 
Some examples of smart contract issues you’d want to avoid are: leaking funds, ‘unexpected changes to critical state variables’ (example: someone other than you setting his or her address as the owner of the smart contract after creation) or simply killing a contract.
 
Scilla also allows for formal verification. Wikipedia to the rescue:
In the context of hardware and software systems, formal verification is the act of proving or disproving the correctness of intended algorithms underlying a system with respect to a certain formal specification or property, using formal methods of mathematics.
 
Formal verification can be helpful in proving the correctness of systems such as: cryptographic protocols, combinational circuits, digital circuits with internal memory, and software expressed as source code.
 
Scilla is being developed hand-in-hand with formalization of its semantics and its embedding into the Coq proof assistant — a state-of-the art tool for mechanized proofs about properties of programs.”
 
Simply put, with Scilla and accompanying tooling developers can be mathematically sure and proof that the smart contract they’ve written does what he or she intends it to do.
 
Smart contract on a sharded environment and state sharding
 
There is one more topic I’d like to touch on: smart contract execution in a sharded environment (and what is the effect of state sharding). This is a complex topic. I’m not able to explain it any easier than what is posted here. But I will try to compress the post into something easy to digest.
 
Earlier on we have established that Zilliqa can process transactions in parallel due to network sharding. This is where the linear scalability comes from. We can define simple transactions: a transaction from address A to B (Category 1), a transaction where a user interacts with one smart contract (Category 2) and the most complex ones where triggering a transaction results in multiple smart contracts being involved (Category 3). The shards are able to process transactions on their own without interference of the other shards. With Category 1 transactions that is doable, with Category 2 transactions sometimes if that address is in the same shard as the smart contract but with Category 3 you definitely need communication between the shards. Solving that requires to make a set of communication rules the protocol needs to follow in order to process all transactions in a generalised fashion.
 
And this is where the downsides of state sharding comes in currently. All shards in Zilliqa have access to the complete state. Yes the state size (0.1 GB at the moment) grows and all of the nodes need to store it but it also means that they don’t need to shop around for information available on other shards. Requiring more communication and adding more complexity. Computer science knowledge and/or developer knowledge required links if you want to dig further: Scilla - language grammar Scilla - Foundations for Verifiable Decentralised Computations on a Blockchain Gas Accounting NUS x Zilliqa: Smart contract language workshop
 
Easier to follow links on programming Scilla https://learnscilla.com/home Ivan on Tech
 
Roadmap / Zilliqa 2.0
 
There is no strict defined roadmap but here are topics being worked on. And via the Zilliqa website there is also more information on the projects they are working on.
 
Business & Partnerships  
It’s not only technology in which Zilliqa seems to be excelling as their ecosystem has been expanding and starting to grow rapidly. The project is on a mission to provide OpenFinance (OpFi) to the world and Singapore is the right place to be due to its progressive regulations and futuristic thinking. Singapore has taken a proactive approach towards cryptocurrencies by introducing the Payment Services Act 2019 (PS Act). Among other things, the PS Act will regulate intermediaries dealing with certain cryptocurrencies, with a particular focus on consumer protection and anti-money laundering. It will also provide a stable regulatory licensing and operating framework for cryptocurrency entities, effectively covering all crypto businesses and exchanges based in Singapore. According to PWC 82% of the surveyed executives in Singapore reported blockchain initiatives underway and 13% of them have already brought the initiatives live to the market. There is also an increasing list of organisations that are starting to provide digital payment services. Moreover, Singaporean blockchain developers Building Cities Beyond has recently created an innovation $15 million grant to encourage development on its ecosystem. This all suggest that Singapore tries to position itself as (one of) the leading blockchain hubs in the world.
 
Zilliqa seems to already taking advantage of this and recently helped launch Hg Exchange on their platform, together with financial institutions PhillipCapital, PrimePartners and Fundnel. Hg Exchange, which is now approved by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), uses smart contracts to represent digital assets. Through Hg Exchange financial institutions worldwide can use Zilliqa's safe-by-design smart contracts to enable the trading of private equities. For example, think of companies such as Grab, AirBnB, SpaceX that are not available for public trading right now. Hg Exchange will allow investors to buy shares of private companies & unicorns and capture their value before an IPO. Anquan, the main company behind Zilliqa, has also recently announced that they became a partner and shareholder in TEN31 Bank, which is a fully regulated bank allowing for tokenization of assets and is aiming to bridge the gap between conventional banking and the blockchain world. If STOs, the tokenization of assets, and equity trading will continue to increase, then Zilliqa’s public blockchain would be the ideal candidate due to its strategic positioning, partnerships, regulatory compliance and the technology that is being built on top of it.
 
What is also very encouraging is their focus on banking the un(der)banked. They are launching a stablecoin basket starting with XSGD. As many of you know, stablecoins are currently mostly used for trading. However, Zilliqa is actively trying to broaden the use case of stablecoins. I recommend everybody to read this text that Amrit Kumar wrote (one of the co-founders). These stablecoins will be integrated in the traditional markets and bridge the gap between the crypto world and the traditional world. This could potentially revolutionize and legitimise the crypto space if retailers and companies will for example start to use stablecoins for payments or remittances, instead of it solely being used for trading.
 
Zilliqa also released their DeFi strategic roadmap (dating November 2019) which seems to be aligning well with their OpFi strategy. A non-custodial DEX is coming to Zilliqa made by Switcheo which allows cross-chain trading (atomic swaps) between ETH, EOS and ZIL based tokens. They also signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a (soon to be announced) USD stablecoin. And as Zilliqa is all about regulations and being compliant, I’m speculating on it to be a regulated USD stablecoin. Furthermore, XSGD is already created and visible on block explorer and XIDR (Indonesian Stablecoin) is also coming soon via StraitsX. Here also an overview of the Tech Stack for Financial Applications from September 2019. Further quoting Amrit Kumar on this:
 
There are two basic building blocks in DeFi/OpFi though: 1) stablecoins as you need a non-volatile currency to get access to this market and 2) a dex to be able to trade all these financial assets. The rest are build on top of these blocks.
 
So far, together with our partners and community, we have worked on developing these building blocks with XSGD as a stablecoin. We are working on bringing a USD-backed stablecoin as well. We will soon have a decentralised exchange developed by Switcheo. And with HGX going live, we are also venturing into the tokenization space. More to come in the future.”*
 
Additionally, they also have this ZILHive initiative that injects capital into projects. There have been already 6 waves of various teams working on infrastructure, innovation and research, and they are not from ASEAN or Singapore only but global: see Grantees breakdown by country. Over 60 project teams from over 20 countries have contributed to Zilliqa's ecosystem. This includes individuals and teams developing wallets, explorers, developer toolkits, smart contract testing frameworks, dapps, etc. As some of you may know, Unstoppable Domains (UD) blew up when they launched on Zilliqa. UD aims to replace cryptocurrency addresses with a human readable name and allows for uncensorable websites. Zilliqa will probably be the only one able to handle all these transactions onchain due to ability to scale and its resulting low fees which is why the UD team launched this on Zilliqa in the first place. Furthermore, Zilliqa also has a strong emphasis on security, compliance, and privacy, which is why they partnered with companies like Elliptic, ChainSecurity (part of PwC Switzerland), and Incognito. Their sister company Aqilliz (Zilliqa spelled backwards) focuses on revolutionizing the digital advertising space and is doing interesting things like using Zilliqa to track outdoor digital ads with companies like Foodpanda.
 
Zilliqa is listed on nearly all major exchanges, having several different fiat-gateways and recently have been added to Binance’s margin trading and futures trading with really good volume. They also have a very impressive team with good credentials and experience. They dont just have “tech people”. They have a mix of tech people, business people, marketeers, scientists, and more. Naturally, it's good to have a mix of people with different skill sets if you work in the crypto space.
 
Marketing & Community
 
Zilliqa has a very strong community. If you just follow their Twitter their engagement is much higher for a coin that has approximately 80k followers. They also have been ‘coin of the day’ by LunarCrush many times. LunarCrush tracks real-time cryptocurrency value and social data. According to their data it seems Zilliqa has a more fundamental and deeper understanding of marketing and community engagement than almost all other coins. While almost all coins have been a bit frozen in the last months, Zilliqa seems to be on its own bull run. It was somewhere in the 100s a few months ago and is currently ranked #46 on CoinGecko. Their official Telegram also has over 20k people and is very active, and their community channel which is over 7k now is more active and larger than many other official channels. Their local communities) also seem to be growing.
 
Moreover, their community started ‘Zillacracy’ together with the Zilliqa core team ( see www.zillacracy.com ). It’s a community run initiative where people from all over the world are now helping with marketing and development on Zilliqa. Since its launch in February 2020 they have been doing a lot and will also run their own non custodial seed node for staking. This seed node will also allow them to start generating revenue for them to become a self sustaining entity that could potentially scale up to become a decentralized company working in parallel with the Zilliqa core team. Comparing it to all the other smart contract platforms (e.g. Cardano, EOS, Tezos etc.) they don't seem to have started a similar initiatives (correct me if I’m wrong though). This suggest in my opinion that these other smart contract platforms do not fully understand how to utilize the ‘power of the community’. This is something you cannot ‘buy with money’ and gives many projects in the space a disadvantage.
 
Zilliqa also released two social products called SocialPay and Zeeves. SocialPay allows users to earn ZILs while tweeting with a specific hashtag. They have recently used it in partnership with the Singapore Red Cross for a marketing campaign after their initial pilot program. It seems like a very valuable social product with a good use case. I can see a lot of traditional companies entering the space through this product, which they seem to suggest will happen. Tokenizing hashtags with smart contracts to get network effect is a very smart and innovative idea.
 
Regarding Zeeves, this is a tipping bot for Telegram. They already have 1000s of signups and they plan to keep upgrading it for more and more people to use it (e.g. they recently have added a quiz features). They also use it during AMAs to reward people in real time. It’s a very smart approach to grow their communities and get familiar with ZIL. I can see this becoming very big on Telegram. This tool suggests, again, that the Zilliqa team has a deeper understanding what the crypto space and community needs and is good at finding the right innovative tools to grow and scale.
 
To be honest, I haven’t covered everything (i’m also reaching the character limited haha). So many updates happening lately that it's hard to keep up, such as the International Monetary Fund mentioning Zilliqa in their report, custodial and non-custodial Staking, Binance Margin, Futures & Widget, entering the Indian market, and more. The Head of Marketing Colin Miles has also released this as an overview of what is coming next. And last but not least, Vitalik Buterin has been mentioning Zilliqa lately acknowledging Zilliqa and mentioning that both projects have a lot of room to grow. There is much more info of course and a good part of it has been served to you on a silver platter. I invite you to continue researching by yourself :-) And if you have any comments or questions please post here!
submitted by haveyouheardaboutit to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

08-06 16:55 - 'Is it safe enough and how profitable is it to take a long-term loan in bitcoins?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/Yoo_Tu removed from /r/Bitcoin within 1-11min

'''
«Institutional investor lender Genesis Global Capital in the quarterly report indicated a 35.3% increase in the issuance of cryptocurrency loans in the second quarter - to a record $ 2.2 billion»
The worst predictions of zitramon1 are beginning to come true. Only a complete ignoramus can decide to take out a loan in cryptocurrency. Any limited emission cryptocurrency pegged to the dollar as a benchmark is not subject to inflation! The cost of most of them will only grow over time.
For example. Taking a loan in bitcoins for 5 years, you will pay in dollars not only the loan itself and the loan interest on it (since in any case you will have to buy bitcoins for USDs) but also the exchange rate difference on the loan and loan interest prevailing at the time of payments!
Calculate for yourself how much you will have to pay by taking a loan in the amount of 10 bitcoins for 5 years at 2 percent per annum at a bitcoin cost of 10,000 $:
- if Bitcoin costs "only" 20,000 $
- if Bitcoin costs "only" 200,000 $
- if bitcoin costs "only" 2,000,000 $
This is exactly what zitramon1 warned about four years ago, pointing out that gold is no longer an icon and a way has been found to extract it with the help of bacteria from any non-precious metal.
At the beginning of 2011 brilliant Russian scientists Viktor Kurashov and Tamara Sakhno made a sensational discovery, for which a patent was received in 2015.
[[link]3

[link]4
In June 2016 the opening was presented to the world at a conference in Switzerland.
[[link]5

The essence of the invention is that using the microbiological method of transmutation of chemical elements discovered by them, gold can be obtained from anything. Even from simple stone, not to mention metals. According to unverified data at the rumor level, the whole process takes about 18 hours and practically does not require any energy costs. If it’s very simple, then the bacteria “eat” the feedstock, for example iron, and “defecate” it with gold. In common people, this process is mistakenly called cold thermonuclear fusion. In other words, these guys invented the Red Lion — i.e. what the occult sciences call Lapis Philosophorum or the philosopher’s stone.
vanus saldarius — the so-called artificially created bacterium for the extraction of gold from the soil in spent salt mines located deep underground. This bacterium is a rational organism with a hard-coded goal and duration of its life. The latter are configured to issue a certain amount of product with a given quality and packaging based on feedback. In other words, the gold of the required sample can be produced by the colony in the form of coins, bars, ingots, briquettes, etc.
The process itself is carried out in three stages:
  1. Sowing. The “field” is treated with an aqueous suspension containing bacteria. A “water mist” containing bacteria is pumped into the mine or sprayed from drones. Then it settles and bacteria begin to form colonies on the basis of a given program. For some hours it lasts, it is not known for sure. Somewhere around a day;
  2. Ripening. In the mine, the catalyst is sprayed starting the transmutation process. After the process is completed and the bacteria receive the corresponding “signaling”, the self-elimination of the created colonies takes place on feedback;
  3. Harvesting. Here it is clear. Go and collect the finished ingots, pollen, coins, or whatever is programmed there.
All this is carefully hidden behind the regular purchase of physical gold by imperial emissaries, the constant increase in the value of gold and bringing it today to more than 2000 US dollars per troy ounce.
'''
Is it safe enough and how profitable is it to take a long-term loan in bitcoins?
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Yoo_Tu
1: www**fips**u/Archiv*/P*T/2*15****/2015.09.20/Index_*u.*t* 2: *ww.*ou*ube.c*m/watch*v*I98*eZ*C*Lw 3: ww**.fi*s*ru/A*ch*ve/PAT*2015F**L/20*5*09.20/Index\_r*.h***^^* 4: *review**ed*.it*fgys*j*5ue**1.*pg?widt*=59*&format=pjpg*amp;a*t*=webp&*mp***55**fd250c**50**5fed78*89fafb08e*a7**b*9 5: *ww.y*utub*.com*w*tch?*=I98xeZg*J*w]*^*
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Need help with a coding solution to determine a users electric transmission rate

Hi all, i've built a web app for bitcoin miners, called the "Bitcoin Cost Estimator” that I would like to adapt for use in solar power. Unfortunately it's only half baked. It uses the NREL API to pull a users electric generation rate based on their address, but without pulling their transmission rate, it's only one half of the true data. I do understand there are intricacies involved here, not everybody pays the same rate for their electricity... utilities charge more if you use more, and it depends on time of day... i just want to get a more accurate number. It does have "estimator" in the title, but as of now it has no way of calculating the transmission charges, only generation... Can anybody help me find an API or an algorithmic method that would allow me to grab the transmission rates by address, zip code, latitude longitude... or some other criteria?
Before someone says something like “just input your rate per KwH” let me tell you, I meet 2-3 people per day who have no clue what their true electric rate is. I sell solar power, and i look at a lot of electric bills, let me give you an example.
Im looking at an Eversource bill right now, displaying a generation rate of 8.53 cents per kilowatt hour, this customer used 1310 kilowatt hours in a month, and has an electric bill of 247.38... if you do the math, 8.53 cents * 1310 does not equal 247.48, it equals 111.74, so often times I’ll walk into a customers home and they say "what are you offering for an electric rate? Because I pay 8.5 cents" and i have to explain to them that with a $247.38 bill, at 1310 kilowatts, their electric rate is closer 18.88 cents. (247.38/1310 = 18.88) if i deduct the connection charge (23.75) we get 223.63, which would actually be a better number to do the math on, because you will always pay a connection fee regardless, even if you unplug everything and use no electricity for the month, you will always pay a service charge just to be connected to the grid. sooo... 223.63/1310 = 17.07 cents/KwH.
Looking over countless bills, I can tell you that number is always somewhere between 17 and 20 cents here in my state, so that's the degree of accuracy i'm looking for... its not 100% accurate, its a spread, but it's far more accurate than doing the math at 8.5 cents. The delivery rates (at least here in CT) are also broken down by kilowatt hour. When i look at the number of people who think their electric rate is something other than what it is, it gives me pause looking at bitcoin mining calculators... How many CT residents are looking at a bitcoin mining calculator and entering 8.5 cents per KwH instead of 17-20 cents per KwH? (I mean obviously nobody is mining bitcoin in CT but still...)
when it comes to delivery the customer on this bill pays the utility company...
2.6 cents/KwH --- transmission charge
3.4 cents/KwH --- distributed charge per KwH
.13 cents/KwH --- Electric system improvement
.2 cents/KwH --- revenue adjustment mechanism
.015 cents/KwH --- CTA charge per KwH
1.08 cents/KwH --- FMCC delivery charge
1.02 cents/KwH --- combined public benefits charge
(These are the pieces missing from my code)
These combined add around 8.5 cents/KwH to his total electric rate... 8.5+8.5 = 17 cents. The connection charge is the only part of the bill not directly linked to KwH usage.
I don't know what the structure is for other bills in other utility districts, but I assume the dataset exists, cause i'm looking at it on my bill, and I look at it on my customers bills every day.
I do have a brute force solution, which would involve looking at a utility bill for every district in the country, and hard coding all of those charges i see from sample bills into the algorithm... the obvious problem with this is that as utility companies raise their rates, I would have to stay on top of that and frequently edit the code...
My algorithm is to collect the users address, convert it to longitude/latitude for my API to digest, then make a get request to the API for the generation rate (not transmission rate) at those coordinates.
Then the bitcoin math... Not to go too in-depth, but it pulls the hashrate, calculates how many KwH needed for any given miner to hash enough to mine one bitcoin (hashes to mine 1 block divided by 12, I understand bitcoin are mined by the block, it’s an abstraction) etc etc.
The point here is to build something idiot proof... there is a large population of people who are incapable of entering their price per kilowatt hour into a calculator, because they literally do not know what their price per KwH is...they just think that they do. They think it’s half of what it is. This demographic makes up about 50-60% of people I meet who want to go solar. (This may be unbelievable to coders, but not to a solar salesman)
I know bitcoin miners are smarter than your average Joe, but people who want to save on their electric bill are generally not well versed in electricity, and I would like my algorithm to have applications beyond the crypto space.
Furthermore, there’s a million bitcoin mining calculator that ask you to put in your price per KwH... the idea here is to build something different.
Not interested in answers along the line of “can’t be done” or “why not just input your price per KwH like any other bitcoin calculator”, so if that’s all you’ve got for me, please save your keystrokes.
submitted by Baconbits1204 to webdev [link] [comments]

Algorand announces $50M grant program to boost its blockchain

The Algorand Foundation has announced a new grants program worth $50 million.
A decentralized finance-focused blockchain platform, Algorand has earmarked a total of 250 million ALGO tokens for the multi-year initiative, designed “to provide funding to projects building apps to support infrastructure, end-user application, and research innovation on its blockchain.”
In addition, on April 14 the Algorand Foundation also announced a new developers portal, featuring tutorials, articles, and use-case solutions featuring code samples and explanations.
Three beneficiaries of the fund have already been announced, who will share six million ALGO (about $1.2 million) between them.
Multi-blockchain infrastructure provider Bloq delivers Algorand nodes and APIs, while PureStake is an open-source browser plug-in allowing developers to add the capacity for Algorand transactions into their applications. Lastly, the development platform Reach is “designed to remove the complexity of building DApps on the Algorand blockchain and to enable the future creation of DAOs, decentralized exchanges and many other DeFi applications on Algorand.”

The criteria

Projects that are selected to receive a grant are chosen based on the positive impact they could have on the Algorand community and on the ecosystem. Other factors include the quality of the application, the technical or academic strength of the proposal, and the concept’s opportunity for growth going forward.
Bloq, PureStake, and Reach are going to undergo an evaluation after receiving the funding. The Algorand Foundation says it plans to introduce an open grant program in the not-too-distant future—enabling the broader community to vote on which projects should receive grants.
“The grant program from the Algorand Foundation is one of the most focused programs out there, and we believe it will be instrumental in accelerating the adoption of Algorand’s platform,” Reach founder Chris Swenor said.
PureStake CEO Derek Yoo added that “easy and pragmatic developer tools are critical to further expanding the accessibility of the Algorand network.”

Cool tool

The Algorand blockchain is the brainchild of Silvio Micali, a Turing-award winning cryptographer and MIT professor who is also one of the minds behind zero-knowledge proofs, a cryptography method gaining a following in privacy-focused cryptocurrency circles. He is No. 81 on the Modern Consensus 100 most influential people in crypto 2020 list.
As reported by Modern Consensus, Algorand recently won plaudits for its energy-efficient blockchain protocol.
In January, French start-up PlanetWatch chose the firm as a partner to put global air quality test results on the blockchain.
Algorand was chosen because of how its platform requires “minimal processing power” to achieve consensus—a serious issue considering that some studies indicate that Bitcoin mining uses as much energy as Switzerland.
submitted by Superb_Recognition to algorand [link] [comments]

Google's highly inaccurate botched results for FG Repacks.

This is probably the most annoying shit I've seen all year, look at what happens when we google fitgirl repacks now (see image)
https://www.google.com/search?q=fitgirl+repacks Results obviously may vary based on location/cookies. I'm within USA.
https://apkfuel.com/journal/fitgirl-repacks/
Just read this shit, it's all whipped up to make it sound technical, literally links virustotal (that's it, not any specific analysis) and talks about "seeing this bitcoin mining technique before because we're super technical and smart" and then links a couple of things from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/wdsi/threats with no reference to the actual malicious files or hash code/checksum/hash sum like MD5 1f42a1b1d3d1e9b3dd9464e37a27fae or SHA256 4a968aaacce2dac93eb63b99a6887906dd1d9298f86e109163a301952f9e2322.
Not even, at the very least is there a https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/ sample. Not even a file name. It just ends off with, "oh no scary temp files" which I am pretty sure are her decompression exe's, it hasn't even crossed my mind to actually analyze them so I don't even know or care (although I always recommend common sense 2020 installed). She is too well-known to suddenly start shitting out malware without being caught. This likely will scare uninformed people away. Especially with a huge ass "Google featured snippets" image and link. Like it's something verified and is to be considered.
submitted by desentas to FitGirlRepack [link] [comments]

THE END OF ALL ASIC MINERS? - Monero's New Superweapon: "Time Locked Proof of Non-ASIC work challenge reward" algorithms.

I propose the following algorithm to end this War of attrition with ASIC / FPGA manufacturers , hopefully once and for all and save us Precious PoW Tweaks during the upcoming forks.
"A time-locked, Proof of 'Non-ASIC work' Challenge reward algorithm"
Here's an image to help you visualise how the algorithm works (details below):
https://imgur.com/a/9S8dA
Here's why we need it:
ASIC manufacturers mine in Secret to attack our decentralized network. They'll win the war since they'll 'get their investment back' before we brick their ASICs, allowing them to launch never-ending attacks against our decentralization, for eternity.
Quick Overview
This algorithm uses the concept of "time-locked reward challenges".
The algorithm ‘time-locks’ the reward, then issues a ‘non-ASIC’ work challenge during each regular PoW Fork, which distributes mined rewards only to CPU and GPU miners who can pass the challenge and prove they are not ASICS, by maintaining their hashrate during the ASIC downtime.
These Hash-rate challenges after PoW Forks successfully ‘detect’, and ‘Severely Penalize’ anyone Mining with an ASIC/FPGA, even those in Secret.
Proof of Concept: An Actual Demonstration
I'll demonstrate this algorithm in action:
Please see this image to help you Visualise how the algorithm works:
https://imgur.com/a/9S8dA
There is a critical flaw and uniquely identifying feature that exists in absolutely 'ALL ASIC and FPGA miners', even those mining in Secret.
As most of you may know, with the upcoming V7 PoW hardfork,
Instead of just destroying an ASIC with a fork, we can further exploit this to attack the ASIC Manufacturer or Miner by taking back all their mined rewards and giving them to the community
The Special timeframe is PoW Fork + 'N' Days. ('N' being however many days remaining where it would be "impossible" to build and startup a new ASIC/FPGA after the fork.)
To exploit this, the algorithm introduces a period of time called the "Mining Rewards Collection Timeframe" (MRCT), the time period in between regular PoW Hardforks. the grey shaded area in this image
This "Mining Rewards Collection Timeframe" is a time whereby all mining profit rewards are 'time-locked' or held hostage in escrow, on either the mining pool, or on the Actual Blockchain code itself, or Both, depending on where this algorithm is eventually deployed.
The algorithm stores the wallet address a mining reward belongs to, and the maximum hash rate (or maximum value adjusted share rate per day) observed during the "Mining rewards collection timeframe" for that particular wallet address.
This "Mining Rewards Collection Timeframe" can be of any duration as required by the developers; 1,2,3,4,5,6 Months or longer . The longer This Timeframe, the more dangerous it is to ASIC miners. Meaning we don't have to rush with forks.
Since it's time-locked, mined coins/rewards cannot be cashed out until the coming challenge; However, mining pools can still choose to payout smaller miners before that time if they have a 'good stable Non-Asic Hash challenge passing history', or a deposit on file, or at their own risk, so most good miners don't have to wait to cashout rewards!. Big miners on the other hand, won't care! Why? Because the delay doesn't cost them anything. (it's a TINY TINY inconvenience compared to the damage ASICs would do to GPU mining profits. I hope this makes sense)
Now for the Critical ANTI-ASIC Work Challenge.
Time passes and the mining rewards collection timeframe ends with a Hardfork that changes the PoW algorithm slightly,
All ASICS and FPGAs are INSTANTLY destroyed.
At the same time, the mining rewards from that collection timeframe are now ready to be paid out.
Since only the CPU / GPU miners are able to hash normally,
The Algorithm now issues a Hash Rate challenge to determine how much of the coins mined were actually mined by ASIC or FPGA miners.
The challenge is nothing special. Miners just have to leave their miners running normally at maximum speed for the period of the challenge, same as they do everyday!
During this challenge, their "Average Maximum Hash rate during the challenge" is compared to the "Maximum Hash Rate speed" recorded on the blockchain during the Mining Rewards Collection Timeframe.
See the green dotted line in the image
Thus at this point, since ASICs are DEAD, they cannot Hash at the same rate during this challenge period, so any significant difference in hashrate would thus clearly indicate the use of an ASIC or FPGA miner.
Now, we have all the information we need to STRIP ASIC Miners of ALL their gains, and Reward GPU miners instead.
As shown in the earlier image
What if a 1 GPU breaks in a 12 GPU mining farm during the challenge? (Very rare) or for some reason, you can't mine during that period? then the miner can simply rent the GPUs from nicehash for the Challenge. An ASIC miner however, cannot use this strategy (because ASICS are not GPUs, explained further below). Also we can implement a 2nd chance option; the confiscated reward may be frozen for the next Cycle; and the miner may get a 2nd chance to prove the hashrate again, with a % reward penalty.
The Beautiful thing is that If ASIC miners fail the challenge, Everyone gets a Bonus share of the Reward Forefitted by the ASIC miners, So Everyone wants the ASIC miners to fail so they get Free extra money. and thus have a financial reason to support this algorithm.
*There is no escaping it... or is there?
Is it ASIC PROOF? Can you Cheat this algorithm?
I've also tried to see if you can work around this algorithm:
  • Example 1: What if they switched in GPUS to mine for an ASIC during the challenge? Well, that wouldn't work. When the challenge comes, they can either save the rewards mined by the GPUs, or save the rewards mined by the ASICs, One will always be lost and result is the same anyway because you'd only get paid for the Hash rate of the GPU. The ASIC portion of the hash rate will ALWAYS be lost.
  • Example 2: What if they use the GPUs to mine a different coin and have them only hash for the ASIC during the challenge period?
  • Consider the Antminer X3. at 200KH/s, to support just "ONE ASIC", they would need over 200 RX 580 Cards or 100 VEGA cards to pass the challenge... costing well over $60,000 (SIXTY THOUSAND DOLLARS) and if they depreciate at ~ 10~15% a year, they'd lose $6000~$9000 a year. it's not enough to cover your losses,
  • Also, What other coin could you mine? If ASICS are so powerful, there won't be another coin except those running this algorithm. Then, the dev can choose to issue the challenge at the same point as the other coin using the same algorithm, so they lose all rewards from one coin as 1 rig cannot sustain two challenge algorithms at the same time.
  • Example 3: What if they just leave some GPUS on standby to avoid the power costs? Then ASIC's would still be unable to be mass produced anyway. Because for every ASIC Mass produced, you'd need to Mass Produce 200 times the GPUS to support them in their place, and own of all them. practically impossible.
  • Example 4: What if they rented hashing power from Nicehash to fill in during the Challenge period?
  • Yes, but so can we! The beautiful thing about this algorithm, is if we rent the limited hashing power on Nicehash first before them at break even or loss, it doesn't matter, Because, the ASIC miner cannot rent and hash rate and will fail the challenge, and Forefit the ENORMOUS amount of Rewards to the community. Imagine, Mining at such a high rate for months on end , the rewards confiscated and paid to GPU miners will easily offset any of the tiny losses renting hashrate from Nicehash, so ultimately, The ASIC miners lose Everything, and the community (you and me) gets all their money.
  • Also if ASICs Dominate the crypto market, there won't be any GPU to rent, all remaining coins would be mining this algorithm, meaning they would have to save their own hashrate for themselves, not rent it to ASIC miners. otherwise they lose their reward. Brand new users may rent their GPU's but its no where near enough to cover the ASIC hash shortfall in the challenge.
  • Example 5: What if they waited till we exhausted our supply of PoW fork tweaks? That's the beauty of this algorithm!. We don't actually have to tweak the PoW algorithm on a constant basis! We can intentionally leave it the same. So Everyone passes the Challenge, Then when we do detect an asic "trying to Mine their Money Back in secret (as they do now)", We tweak the PoW at the Next Hardfork. Destroying and bankrupting their very first attempt, and we get all their money and rewards, So there's no need to waste a PoW tweak in a pre-emptive strike, because the rewards are Time-Locked to the future. We can lie in wait with a single PoW like a Trap, and eat them alive (literally we get all their rewards after the challenge!). We can maintain this lethal threat to ASIC manufacturers without having to change the PoW at all!
And remember, all this effort is just for ONLY, ONE ASIC. meaning you Can't mass produce it.
So ultimately it wouldn't even make sense to even develop an ASIC, as you'd be far more profitable just mining only with the 200+ GPU's required to cheat the algorithm.
*So in summary, *
  • No ASIC/FPGA miner can escape the challenge. Not even those running in secret.
  • All ASIC miners are guaranteed to suffer a huge (possibly fatal) financial loss, with no prospect of any return on investment. Time locked rewards ensure No secret pre-mining with ASICs is possible. ASICs are destroyed with each challenge, all R&D and manufacturing costs and the electricity bill used to power them is wasted for basically "ZERO returns",
  • …..and lets not forget that all their rewards gets given away to other honest miners like you and Me!. ( LOL!) or potentially the developers of the fork :)
  • As long as the algorithm is active and used by multiple coins, no ASICs will ever exist to mine in secret,
  • We save precious PoW tweak changes, since there's no need for a pre-emptive PoW strike to prevent 'ASIC hit and run' pre-mine scenarios.
  • ASIC manufacturers see that the war is un-winnable and go invest in other things,
So, in theory, The War Ends. (at least for a very good part of the future)
As they say: " Don't build a wall and hide in fear.... Build a wall and launch missiles from behind it against the enemy so they will never dare attack us again."
I would like to point out that time locked reward challenges are already in use by the Olympic games to Strip drug cheats in the past by storing samples and testing them in the future, and it's also in the PPLNS minig pool algorithms to deter pool hopping cheats, and also in the Bitcoin's Lightning network in the form of decrementing time-locks" that 'enforce the transfer of funds' under certain conditions.
Is it beautiful? Will it work? Can it be done? Let's discuss this
submitted by MoneroChan to Monero [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Guide

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Guide
Happy Mining!

All available XRC pools can be found on MiningPoolStats

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Hardware

Baikal Giant+: 1.6 GH/s
Baikal Quad Cube: 1.2 GH/s
Baikal Giant: 900 MH/s
Baikal Quadruple Mini Miner: 600 MH/s
Baikal Miner Cube: 300 MH/s
Baikal Mini Miner: 150 MH/s

Mining Setup

To mine Bitcoin Rhodium you need to set up an XRC wallet and configure your miner of choice. You can choose between Web wallet, Electrum-XRC or Magnum wallet. To set up a web wallet please visit wallet.bitcoinrh.org. Or download and install Electrum-XRC wallet (recommended) for Windows, Linux and MacOS.
Web wallet: wallet.bitcoinrh.org
Electrum-XRC wallet: electrum.bitcoinrh.org
Magnum wallet: https://magnumwallet.co

Sign up for XRC web wallet if not yet done so

  1. Create an account, with your username, password and secure question.
  2. Sign in and click “Create Wallet”.
  3. Set up a strong transaction password. Make sure you store it securely in a secure password manager of choice.
  4. Copy the seed somewhere safe. It’d be a good idea to write seed on a hardcopy and keep it safe.
  5. Paste it to confirm you got it right.
  6. Grab an address for the mining step. Your wallet is now ready to mine XRC.

Instructions for mining XRC on the official pool

Pool link: poolcore.bitcoinrh.org
  1. Any miner that supports X13 will be able to mine XRC. We have a few examples below of miners that are well tested with Bitcoin Rhodium network.
  2. For any miner, configure the miner to point to:
(0–0.8 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3061
(0.8–2 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062
(3–4 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3063
(5+ GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3064
with your XRC address as username and x as password. You don’t need to open an account on pool. You will be mining to XRC address and mined coins will be transferred to your wallet
after blocks reach 10 block maturity
after you mined up minimal amount of coins (currently 0.1 XRC)
sometimes mined blocks could get rejected by network (orphaned) after they were counted as valid blocks. This is normal network behavior to follow longest chain
  1. http://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org is used to follow your miner and network statistics.

CPU Miner-Multi

Source: https://github.com/tpruvot/cpuminer-multi
Sample configuration with CPU Miner tested on UBUNTU.
{
“url” : “stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3061”, “user” : “YOUR XRC ADDRESS”,
“pass” : “x”,
“algo” : “x13”, “threads” : 1,
“cpu-priority” : 5,
“cpu-affinity” : 1, “benchmark” : false, “debug” : true, “protocol”: true, “show-diff”: true, “quiet” : false
}
Command to run your CPUMiner: cpuminer -c cpuminer.json

SGMiner (ATI GPU)

SGMiner is a GPU-based mine: https://github.com/nicehash/sgminereleases
The configuration below was tested on Windows:
setx GPU_FORCE_64BIT_PTR 0
setx GPU_MAX_HEAP_SIZE 100
setx GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS 1
setx GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
setx GPU_SINGLE_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
cd C:\Software\sgminer-5.6.1-nicehash-51-windowsamd64 sgminer.exe
— gpu-platform 1 — algorithm x13mod -url stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh. org:3062 — pool-user — userpass :x — auto-fan — temp-target 70 — temp-over- heat 82 — temp-cutoff 85 — gpu-fan 65–85 — log-file log.txt — no-adl — no-extra- nonce -P –T

CCMiner (NVIDIA GPU)

CCMiner is a GPU-based miner (NVIDIA)
Command to run your CCMINER:
ccminer-x64.exe -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062 -O :without -D — show-diff

Baikal miner

Settings: Url:
(0–2 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062
(3–4 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3063
(5+ GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3064
Algo: x13User: your XRC receiving address (make sure you set 2 distinct addresses for each hashing board)
Pass: x
Extranonce: leave off Priority set to 0 and 1
Once pool stratum address and your wallet as user are set up you should see your miner mining against XRC pool. When miner is working the status column is green. The pool and miner are incorrectly configured now as status says “Dead” highlighted in red.

Instructions for mining XRC on BSOD pool

Pool link: bsod.pw/en/pool/dashboard/XRC/
Use this code for your miner: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig
BSOD pool allows both solo and party mining.
For solo mining use code: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig -p m=solo And for party mining use: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig -p m=party.yourpassword
NOTICE: You can use us for North America and asia for Asia instead of euin your .bat file or config.
You can also use BSOD pool’s monitor app for Android and iOS.

Instructions for mining XRC on ZERGPOOL

Zergpool offers low fees (just 0.5%) and also SOLO and PARTY mining with no extra fees.
To mine XRC on Zergpool use this command lines for your miner:
Regular: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC Solo: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC,m=solo Party: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC,m=party
Use your coin wallet address as username in mining software. Specify c=SYMBOL as password to identify payout wallet coin, and the same coin in mc=SYMBOL to specify mining coin.
For more information and support please visit http://zergpool.com
Notice that when there are more pools mining XRC in different geographic/availability locations choose the nearest to you as lowest priority and then add desirable fall back pool options in different geographic locations or pools. This is useful when one pool experiences issues, to fall back to different pool in Bitcoin Rhodium network.

Calculate your Bitcoin Rhodium mining profitability

WhatToMine: https://whattomine.com/coins/317-xrc-x13
CoinCalculators: https://www.coincalculators.io/coin/bitcoin-rhodium

Feel free to ask questions in Discord community. There are lots of helpful people around the world watching XRC 24x7.

Bitcoin Rhodium Dev Team
submitted by BitcoinRh to BitcoinRhodium [link] [comments]

How I Got Paid By 65 Different Beermoney Programs in 2018 [Guide]

How I Got Paid By 65 Different Beermoney Programs in 2018

Hi! Welcome to my guide for everything that paid me in 2018. Before I begin, here are a few details:
Now, let’s get into the good stuff.

1. Quickthoughts - $590

This was my top earner for the year and it only took me up until September to earn this amount. I had to stop because they require a W9 for anything over $600 and I was too lazy to file that. It is pretty similar to a traditional survey router, but I seem to have much better luck with not disqualifying here. I get paid $1 per survey but some people earn $2 per survey based on their demographics. Some people have issues with bans and getting locked out of accounts, so it is not for everyone. Because of this, it is important to cash out the minute you hit the cashout minimum of $10. There are both android and iOS apps but I highly recommend using android if possible because the iOS app pays in iTunes gift cards and the android app pays in Amazon gift cards. Overall, Quickthoughts is great if you are one of the lucky ones without account issues.

2. CrowdTap - $270

This is one of my favorite beermoney programs of all time. You complete a variety of very short polls and questions about consumer goods, food products, and services. The polls pay 1.5 cents each and the short answer questions pay 10 cents each. There are other ways that they ask questions, including longer surveys that are a combination between the polls and questions. All of them are well worth it for the time that they take. Reward options include Amazon, Target, Walmart, Steam, Xbox, and more. You can cash out starting at $5 and I am able to cash out about once a week. Definitely add this one to your routine if you have not yet.

3. Prolific Academic - $197.95

This one is great. Take academic surveys for universities and researchers and get paid in cash. As long as you don’t miss attention checks you won’t get disqualified. Some people get multiple surveys a day and others get only a few a week based on demographics. Many pay at least minimum wage. I could have made a lot more on here if I tried. Universally regarded as one of the most “worth it” survey sites so give it a shot!

4. Pinecone Research - $138 + Ranch Dip and Dog Chews

Pinecone pays a guaranteed $3 for 10-15 min surveys regarding opinions on new products. They also send free samples sometimes! You can cash out for a variety of gift cards or PayPal. I get about 1 survey a week on average. Pinecone is invite only so look for invites to sign up on other GPT sites as sometimes you can find them there. If you get in it is some of the best money you can make with surveys for the time you spend on it.

5. Branded Surveys - $130

Branded Surveys has traditional router surveys. A major perk of using Branded used to be their generous daily login bonus. This has been reduced to 5 cents a day, so it might not be worth using this site for the login bonus alone anymore. They have a very high EngageMe rate at one cent per 3 videos if that’s your thing as well! Payouts start at $10 via Paypal and Amazon.

6. Nicequest - $120

Big fan of this one. Their surveys have guaranteed rewards even if you screen out and can pay up to $2-3 for like 10-15 minutes. Their currency is “shells” and each shell converts to about 7 cents. Installing their meter on your devices adds a guaranteed 5 shells per survey. If you add it to your computer, phone, and tablet you get an extra 15 shells (about a dollar) per survey. I just have it on my computer so I get 5 bonus shells. Cashouts are quick for e-gift cards and they also offer physical items. Saving up for larger gift cards typically gives you better rates.

7. PrizeRebel - $107

PrizeRebel is your typical GPT site with a variety of ways to earn, but it is most well-known for surveys. They pay $0.80 per survey on the YourSurvey router and that is where a majority of my earnings have come. Lots of cashout options starting at $2.

8. YouGov - $100

YouGov is a survey site/app that pays anywhere from $0.50 to $2 per survey. The best part of it is that you never disqualify. I get a couple surveys a week. Most of the surveys are about public policy, politics, or general opinions of companies. You get the best value for your points if you save up for the $100 cash out. They offer the $100 cash out in bank transfer and Amazon. The Amazon gift card option used to be a physical mailed card but now its an e-gift card so that makes it even better! They offer other gift cards but they are for smaller values at worse rates so I would avoid them. Available online, on android, and on iOS.

9. iMoney - $89

Get paid to download apps! The best thing about iMoney is that the apps always credit and you can get credit for apps you have downloaded before. That’s not the case on most paid-to-download apps. Earn 15-30 cents per app and there are 3-4 new apps available each day. They offer Amazon and PayPal but PayPal has a small fee. Added this towards the end of the year and hope to make more next year. Might not be in the app store at the moment? Couldn’t find a link to put in the title.

10. VeryDice - $65

Roll dice, get points, redeem for physical items and e-gift cards. I get the daily spin rolls every day and watch their ads for more rolls. The key to VeryDice is saving up approximately 100 rolls before rolling to have enough to get the daily doubles bonus of $0.30. Worth keeping on your phone even if it’s just for the daily spin rolls. Available on both iOS and Andoid. If you want to enter my ref code at sign up you’ll get 30 free rolls :). It is 1319422.

11. Forthright - $62

Sign up and receive invitations to surveys via email. Don’t do their “partner surveys”, they rarely credit and you can get stuck in an endless loop. Their non-partner surveys are awesome. They pay well for the time spent but they also have one of the best disqualification bonusses I have ever seen. Every three surveys you take, regardless of whether you disqualify or not, you get a $2 bonus. That is $0.66 per survey on top of its base pay regardless of whether you qualify or not. They pay instantly with PayPal, Amazon, or Bitcoin.

12. VolKno - $55

Do you like movies? Then this one’s for you. Watch, rate, and tag movie trailers to earn Amazon gift cards. Each trailer has three stages and after completing all three you will make 23.5 cents per trailer. One thing to keep in mind is that you need a physical verification card sent to a US address in order to activate your account. I completed basically every trailer that was posted over the year, so my earnings are a good estimate of what you can plan on earning.

13. Inbox Dollars - $52.03

A pretty shit GPT site with a high minimum cash out. Not sure how I ever hit the minimum cash out here. Would not recommend.

14. Zap Surveys (Ref for $0.75 bonus) - $52.03

There are three main ways to earn here: a 3 cent daily login bonus, 7 cent location rewards for opening the app when a notification appears, and surveys. If you’re going to do surveys on here do relatively short TapResearch ones. The location rewards alone are why I use this app. The one negative of this app is that the cash out minimum is $25. Definitely worth having on your phone!

15. PointClub - $50

This is a pretty normal survey site. They have a daily login streak bonus that can double the value of your surveys when you reach the max streak which can make a lot of them worth your time. I stopped receiving surveys, so I assume I’m banned? So be careful with this one. Cash out minimums are $25 which is higher than I would like.

16. Survey Monkey Rewards - $49.15

Another one of my favorites. Survey Monkey Rewards is a survey app created by Survey Monkey, a big name in survey development software. Surveys all take under 3-4 minutes and pay either 25 or 35 cents based on length. I almost never disqualify, and you can cash out instantly to Amazon starting at $5. Available on Android and iOS.

17. Earn.com - $71.31

Earn.com lets people pay Bitcoin to contact you. I mostly received BTC to sign up for ICOs and airdrops for random tokens. They were aquired by Coinbase so there are changes to the program. They require a LinkedIn to make an account now as well (I think). If you can get into the program still it is pretty great!

18. MyPoints - $45

This is a sister-site to Swagbucks. I have decent success with their surveys so I use it for that. They have some other ways to earn but I don’t use them. If you have the same success with their surveys it might be worth using.

19. MicroWorkers - $44.16

Basically a smaller and sketchier MTurk. Lots of short tasks with decent earning potential but you have to find the right type of tasks for you. I did the click, search tasks for a while. There is PayPal with a $9 minimum but if I remember right they mail you a physical card with a pin before you can cash out to verify your identity. Not for everyone but worth a look.

20. SurveysOnTheGo - $43.30

This one is pretty simple. Get surveys on your phone, and redeem for Amazon, Visa, PayPal, and Starbucks! Surveys range from $0.50-$10. Some are location based and involve in-store activities. The more involved the surveys are, the more they pay. Don’t expect a ton of surveys, but many of them are worth your time. Available on Android and iOS. Minimum cash out is $10.

21. Survey Junkie - $40

This survey site is average at best. I am having less success with them recently because I can’t be bothered to take a 20 minute survey for $0.90. The one benefit of this site is that they have a VERY small disqualification bonus. Some people do have success taking surveys on here and the cash out minimum is $10.

22. E-Poll - $35

Another survey provider with no disqualifications! Woohoo! You receive email notifications when you have a new survey. Surveys pay $0.50-$2 and are usually not too long. They pay via a points system and you get better rates if you save up for the higher rewards. I cash out for Amazon, and they can take a long time to deliver rewards so be patient.

23. MooCash - $33.60

MooCash pays you to download apps and then open them for 3 days once a day. I have gotten paid as much as $2 for a single app download. They don’t always credit super easily so I would only try the better paying ones. You can cash out for BTC, Amazon, PayPal, and more. You can use my ref code (EHNPNC) when you sign up for some free coins. I think it’s only available to the first 20 people.

24. InstaGC - $33

This is a pretty basic and easy to use GPT site. Very low cashout minimums with lots of options. Check out LiveSample and YourSurveys for a good place to start on surveys.

25. PaidViewpoint (Ref) - $32.65

Short surveys with minimum PayPal cashout of $15. There are short surveys to collect demographic information that pay 10 cents. If you qualify for any of the longer surveys they can pay as much as $1.50. Surveys can be sporadic so just check the site once a day. Worth the time it takes to put into it.

26. UserCrowd (UsabilityHub) - $32.40

UsabilityHub, now rebranded to UserCrowd, pays you to give feedback on websites and products. Each task pays anywhere from 10-50 cents and the minimum cash out is $10. UserCrowd is nice because unlike other usability testing sites you don’t need to record your voice or screen. I leave it in a pinned tab on Chrome and get notifications when there is a new task. They can vary in how often you get them. I enjoy this one, give it a shot.

27. OnePulse - $30

This app has very short surveys with guaranteed rewards. You never disqualify or anything like that. I get a notification that I have a new paid survey about once a week. Surveys pay 30 cents to start but as you “level up” they become worth slightly more. Right now mine are worth 34 cents. Cashout is at $5 via PayPal. Available on iOS and Android.

28. Watchback - $30

This is the best sweepstakes app I have used. You get entries into the sweepstakes by watching videos. Each video is an entry. I watch 10 videos a day and usually win either $0.50 or $1 each day. It pays via Perk points so it’s a nice supplement to your Perk routine. If this keeps being so easy to win I should make a lot more with it next year! Available on Android and iOS.

29. Dabbl - $30

I started using Dabbl towards the very end of the year. They offer short brand-sponsored polls and videos that pay anywhere from 5-20 cents. These are super infrequent and cashing out from these alone would take the better part of a year. Where I earn with Dabbl is their non-passive ads. You get paid 1 cent per ad so I run them when I’m doing other things. It adds up. They don’t offer Amazon so I cash out for Target. Cash outs are at $5. iOS and Android.

30. Gravy - $25

This is a pretty fun game show app. To summarize the game, you pick a percentage that you think a product will sell out at, and if you’re within the closest few people to the right percentage you win a decent little chunk of cash. I’ve won once. You can buy discounted products on here as well. Go check it out, it’s pretty addicting. My ref code is “Leeves” if you want to throw some bonus guesses my way :).

31. KinIt - $25

Take short polls and quizzes and get paid 6-25 cents a day. The unfortunate thing about KinIt is that they very rarely have their gift cards in stock. When they have them in stock they have a decent selection. Still worth your time in my opinion. iOS and Android are supported.

32. Life Fun and Everything - $25

This was an invite-only survey panel that gives me a $2 survey once a month. Found it on some GPT site.

33. Panel - $25

Install Panel on your phone and get paid for sharing your location data. They drastically reduced their pay rate recently so I’m not sure it’s worth it anymore. Previously you could expect to make about $25 a year.

34. Perksy (Ref) - $25

Short polls that pay anywhere from $0.50 to $1. I get about one a week. Only downside is that the minimum cash out is $25. Various gift cards (including Amazon) are available. Definitely worth keeping on your phone. I think it’s iOS only at this time.

35. Swagbucks - $25

One of the easiest GPT sites to use. Lots of offer walls and surveys. I don’t make a lot here but basically just do daily search, daily poll, Swago, and SwagIQ. If I wasn’t banned from their surveys for some reason I might make a little more. I use swagbucks from time to time to find easy offers to do. Overall, a decent place to start of you’re experimenting with beermoney for the first time.

36. Survey Mini- $25

This app uses your location data and pays you 10 cents (sometimes more) to fill out a short poll about stores and restaurants that you go to. They recently added e-gift cards instead of physical cards so that makes it a lot more attractive to use! iOS and Android.

37. IBotta - $20

This is one of the better apps that give you rebates on select grocery items as you shop in-store. If you buy a lot of groceries, there is money to be made here. They also have traditional online cashback portals and offers.

38. Streetbees - $19

This app has surveys with a more personal and fun spin. You get paid via PayPal for each task that you finish. There aren’t always tasks available but when there are, they often pay well. I had one for testing an app that paid $9! It’s a nice option for something a little different than traditional surveys.

39. AttaPoll - $15.29

Attapoll is a survey app that sends you more traditional router surveys (many of which are Cint surveys). You might disqualify quite a bit here depending on your demographic so I stick to the short ones. Payouts are via PayPal, Bitcoin, and Ethereum. PayPal starts at $3 (nice), ETH at $3.50, and BTC at an insane $100. On both Android and iOS.

40. Smores - $15

Smores is an Android lock screen app that pays a flat $0.10 a day for unlocking your device once. Their non-passive video section pays a cent per 2 videos at the moment so that can be a decent earner as well. Cash out as low as $1 for Amazon and other gift cards. I was pretty inconsistent in my daily unlocks this year and hope to increase my earnings next year.

41. Crowdology - $10.04

Very straight forward. Do surveys, get paid. Some people have success with this type of site, and others disqualify a lot. I would stick to any surveys under 10 minutes in length to avoid wasting your time. Cash out for Amazon or PayPal at $10.

42. Achievement - $10

This app pays you based on your steps. I have it connected to Apple Health. It took me about 9 months to earn $10 and I am pretty active. Android and iOS are both supported. Doesn’t run in the background or drain my battery from what I can tell so it’s very passive and harmless.

43. Gamermine (Ref code for $1 bonus) - $10

This is a GPT site with a few offer walls. They have good EngageMe rates as well as a 5 cent daily bonus as long as you’re making a dollar a week on offers on the site. This is basically the only truly passive income that I have made this year from running EngageMe.

44. Cross Media Panel - $10

This is a program through Google that paid you to let them have an extension on your browser and on your phone. They discontinued most of this program so I am no longer earning from them. Parts of this program still exist but I haven’t looked into it much. Probably just worth skipping over at this point.

45. Lifetap - $10

This app is just a garbage survey router now. It used to have some other short guaranteed-pay surveys. I wouldn’t mess with this anymore.

46. PayTime - $9.99

Paytime lets you earn money for your subscriptions by watching ads and answering a few questions about them. You can only cash out once a month because it is supposed to be used for monthly subscriptions. All they do is send you $9.99 via PayPal or Venmo once you watch 40 ads. The catch with PayTime is that you need to be a student at one of the universities that they support. Check their website for the list. Overall, if you are a student it could be an easy $10 a month. Hope to use this more next year.

47. Ready Games - $9.19

Get paid to play games! There is a new game every 48 hours and the top 20% of scores at the end of the time period get paid. The top player makes $7 and the payout decreases as you go down the ranks. I have won somewhere around $2.50 every game that I have made it into the top 20%. Pays via PayPal when you win. On Android and iOS. You can use share code “lucky-disk-68” if you want to give me some extra lives :).

48. Carepoynt - $7

This is a pretty bad healthy living/rewards site. I think they had a few easy ways to earn, like downloading their app, and that’s how I cashed out. There was a post about it so be looking for opportunities like these on the subreddit. I won’t be using this again.

49. Amazon Shipping History Task - $6

Look for tasks like this that get posted on the subreddit. Got paid to submit some shipping data from Amazon.

50. DailyWin - $6

This used to be a scratch card app with a non-passive video section but it seems to be dead. Move along, nothing to see here.

51. CitizenMe - $5.97

Take short polls. Get instantly paid small amounts of money via Paypal. Pays in GBP so if your currency is USD you get to take advantage of that increase in value. Polls are spotty but worth it due to the instant payout (so no minimum or anything like that). iOS and Android.

52. PollPass - $5.15

Answer polls and get paid! Pays via PayPal at $5. Very simple and fun to use. Just answer the polls whenever they are available and watch the points add up. Added this at the end of the year so hope to expand on this next year.

53. Brand Insights Polling - $5

I honestly have no clue how I got paid by them. I think I took a survey that I found from a Facebook ad or something?

54. CashForApps - $5

Get paid to download apps! They don’t pay the best and sometimes have a hard time crediting but still might be worth a shot. The very best paying apps pay around 30 cents. Some pay pennies. Available on iOS and Android. You can use my invite code “4848a6” and get a few free points.

55. EarnWallet - $5

This was a from a promotion that was posted on beermoney for just downloading EarnWallet. Check out the sub for opportunities for occasional promotional opportunities like this.

56. Shopkick - $5

Scan items, check into stores, and earn cash back for buying certain items. Not a huge earner but can be fun to mess around with when you’re out shopping. Available on iOS and Android.

57. Louder Rewards - $5

This app paid $5 Amazon to download 5 apps and use them for 3 minutes. It was a one time offer so I don’t use it anymore. It’s on iOS and Android.

58. Qmee - $4.68

Install their extension and get paid a few cents for random searches that you make. They also have surveys. I use PayPal to cash out and there aren’t any minimums that that’s cool!

59. Google Opinion Rewards - $4.68

This app sends you occasional very short surveys from Google that pay 10-20 cents. Using Google services and being mobile seems to increase the number of surveys that you get. Some people get a lot, some get less. Worth just having on your phone. The iOS app pays via PayPal and the Android app just give you Google Play credits.

60. College Pulse - $5

This app has polls for college students to take. I think you need a .edu email address? Their rewards kinda suck so I stopped using it but they had an offer to cashout for $5 bitcoin to the Ben bitcoin wallet so I did that. Maybe worth it depending on what reward options they have at the time. Android and iOS.

61. Fetch Ref Code For $2-$5 Bonus: XE2XG - $3

Scan receipts and get paid. I get 2.5 cents per receipt on average. They also have products that you can get rebates on when you buy (sorta like iBotta). They only accept grocery store receipts. A good addition to your receipt scanning routine.

62. Quick Survey - $1.61

See my section on iMoney. Very similar but with less apps available and larger fees.

63. CoinOut - $1.02

This is one of the most straight forward receipt scanning apps. It pays 1-5 cents a receipt (typically 2 cents). Cash out starts at $1 for Amazon or PayPal which is way lower than most receipt apps. Very nice. Hope to earn more with this next year. Has both Android and iOS apps.

64. Indeed Job Spotter - $1

This app pays you $0.50 per sign to submit help wanted signs that you find around your city. I have never actually submitted a sign but got paid $0.10 per sign to verify the validity of other people’s signs. I’ve seen people make pretty decent money on here.

65. 1Q - $0.25

This one seemed cool at first. Take short polls, get paid $0.25 instantly via PayPal. The problem is that I never get polls anymore. Others have had the same experience. You might be able to squeak a few cents out of it. Android and iOS.

TOTAL: $3014.92

Hope this helps you guys out, and if you have any questions let me know! Let me know what I should add to my routine :). Thanks to everyone who contributes to this subreddit because I found many of these programs thanks to you! Have a great 2019!
submitted by Goldeneye0242 to beermoney [link] [comments]

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